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Looking for innoculant for carob, mimosa and lucaena

 
Clayton Taylor
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Looking for somewhere to buy inoculnts in the United States for these trees. Any information would be a huge help for a project I'm dooing on a 3.75 acre flower/vegetable farm in Ventura CA.
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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There's a good chance the requisite bacteria are ubiquitous in the air and the trees will self-inoculate. If you start them in pots and repot or plant out at some point you can get a look at the roots and see. Active nodules should be reddish inside. I did this with mimosa here...planted seed in pots, Acacia too, and both were nodulated by the time they were ready to transplant. You could also look for nodules on established trees of the desired species or close relatives, and mash these up with some water and drench the roots of your seedlings as an inoculant. Some simply add some soil from beneath mature, nodulated trees to the seedling mix.
 
Clayton Taylor
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Thank you!
 
Mike Haych
Posts: 216
Location: Eastern Canada, Zone 5a
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Alder Burns wrote:There's a good chance the requisite bacteria are ubiquitous in the air and the trees will self-inoculate.


Everything that I've read says that the rhizobia have a symbiotic relationship with the roots and exist only in the soil.
 
Michael Qulek
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Most likely you can't actually buy innoculum for the at all. That is only for large commercial crops like soybeans, and the strains used there are plant specific. You're better off just finding a Carob, or mimosa, or lucaena somewhere and just scrapping up a potfull of soil/humus from around the roots of the trees. That will supply the innoculum you need.

You also need to remember that nitrogen fixation is only really important in nitrogen deficient soils. If your soil is not already starved for nitrogen they will still do fine. I started my Carobs from seed, and didn't even bother collecting litter from under the seedstock trees. All my seedlings still had dark green leaves.
 
Clayton Taylor
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I found a source in Australia but they said the inoculate wouldn't be any good by the time it got to California.
 
Benjamin Sizemore
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Location: Colorado @ 7000 feet. zone negative 87b
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I buy a mixed myco-bacterial culture in powder form from a place called fungi-perfect in Washington. They have a website. There are so many different bugs and beasties that it has worked on everything I put it on. I have 3 month old locust and wisteria seedlings in kegger cups with root nodules after using it.
 
Clayton Taylor
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Thanks, I'll check out that website.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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