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Leek Ideas

 
pollinator
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Location: Western Washington
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It's that time of year when the leeks are starting to get large and I've been bandying about ideas for cooking with them. I am pondering wraps.
My first thoughts where to peel back the few outside layers and trim them into 7 or 8 inch squares and then stuff them with barley steamed in vegetable broth. And then either steaming or lightly brushing with oil and baking the whole shabam. Or maybe steaming the barley and then frying it with some mushrooms and leek heart and then stuffing and baking. I don't know but I think I'm going to fool around with it this weekend. Anyone done anything like that? Leek wraps? Stuff Leeks? What else sounds good? Other than cream sauce, I'm going bankrupt over here on all the creamy leek dishes.
 
steward
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Landon Sunrich wrote:My first thoughts where to peel back the few outside layers and trim them into 7 or 8 inch squares and then stuff them (...) baking the whole shabam


Wow, your leeks must be big!
If you steamed the layers first to make them pliable I imagine you could use them for wraps-way more work than I'm into though.
Definitely on baking the whole thing-I'd do it long and slow as I like my leeks really well cooked
Barley makes a very nice 'risotto', just add mushrooms and leeks...
Caramelised leeks-cut into rings and cooked long and slow just like onions-are delicious.
Traditional leek and potato soup is great.



 
master pollinator
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Tough portions can be run through a blender for soup.
 
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Think Leek version of a stuffed pepper.
I add red or yellow diced peppers to the stuffing mix. I hate green peppers!!!
You then stuff a long tube of leek or you use a cut leek and use a leek piece to tie it closed.
As you bake these the leek flavor will work its way into the stuffing.

You can also use turkey stuffing mix to stuff a leak.
I bake these till the leek is crispy.
 
pollinator
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Leeks are great in most soups! LOL - Lots of Leeks!

They also dehydrate great for using in soup later - it's very easy to harvest, slice, dry, and store them away...
 
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/27/leek--bacon-pie_n_1056867.html



Bacon leek pie?
 
gardener
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I like to put them in, say nori wraps, or casseroles, soups, pasta dishes, as kind of an onion and a leafy green wrapped into one. I usually cut them at the soil line so they'll come back (it doesn't kill the plant), so they're super easy to clean and prepare. I also mix them with eggs, mushrooms, beans and any other kind of side dish. I have also steamed them up on a griddle and mixed with chile and soy sauce and it's good as a vegetable. No longer so picante. You can put some in a salad.
John S
PDX OR
 
steward
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Now, you've made me hungry.
I'll have to dig through my recipes for that wonderful Irish leek soup I had years ago.
I remember that it uses a whole chicken, and bunches of leeks.
(And, believe it or not, a bunch of prunes!)

 
pollinator
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Leek dumplings traditional fare from NE england

http://www.thejournal.co.uk/culture/restaurants-bars/mince-leek-dumpling-peppery-swede-4465104

David
 
steward
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Lentils cooked in tomato sauce with sautéed leeks. It's a one pot dish that I remember for at least 25 years but never have leeks enough to make. Simple seasoning, maybe some allspice and cloves.

I suspect they would also be excellent sliced in half length-wide, put slice side down on an olive oil greased baking sheet and roasted at high temperature (450 or so) until they start to caramelize. I can't think of a veg I've roasted using that technique that hasn't been good. It's easy to do a couple sheets on a weekend and snack on them out of the frig all week. Don't mix the veg up, keep each type on a separate part of the tray because they finish at different times. Green beans are faster than carrots. Each veg on the sheet in a single layer.

Leek and potato potage is a French classic. And Cock-a-leekie pie (or this one) from across the channel.

Braised leeks and apples sounds good. I need to go inspect my leek patch, but I didn't have much success in growing them this year.
 
Mother Tree
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Cawl Cennin, aka Welsh Leek Soup

It does appear to have a bit of cream in it, though I'm sure the ones I used to eat as a kid never did.
 
pollinator
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Burra Maluca wrote:Cawl Cennin, aka Welsh Leek Soup

It does appear to have a bit of cream in it, though I'm sure the ones I used to eat as a kid never did.



The cream is added at the end almost like a garnish.

This is a timely thread for me as I am thinking about harvesting my leeks. I often include leeks in quiche.
 
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I found a great recipe in Food and Wine magazine a few years ago and have made it many times. It is so delicious and anyone who has tried it loves it. You may need to make a double batch. I looked online to see if I could find the recipe. Here is a link Turkish-Style Leeks.
 
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