I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

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Freezing an egg glut  RSS feed

 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I don't have chickens, and people know I'm always after eggs.
I freeze excess for winter. Each 'egg cube'= about 1 egg.
By the way: if you're not familiar with a rotary egg beater, I highly recommend them, especially for effortlessly whisking egg whites.
Mine is an oldschool 'Swift Whip' I inherited from my nana, along with her preserving jars and rings
The cheap versions are rubbish.






 
Ghislaine de Lessines
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Location: Vermont, annual average precipitation is 39.87 Inches
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Interesting! I froze some of my duck eggs this spring but I chose to have one cube be yolk, and another be white. Even splitting them like that I ended up with white overflowing into the neighboring cube. Perhaps your trays are larger. You have a good source of eggs there, nice and orange!
 
Leila Rich
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Ghislaine de Lessines wrote: I froze some of my duck eggs this spring but I chose to have one cube be yolk, and another be white

That's fancy! I might try this with the next batch if I'm not feeling too lazy
Ghislaine de Lessines wrote: Even splitting them like that I ended up with white overflowing into the neighboring cube. Perhaps your trays are larger. You have a good source of eggs there, nice and orange

These trays are really big and old; apparently they liked massive ice cubes in the 70s.
They might even handle a separated duck egg...
As for the colour-it is pretty intense. I promise I haven't amped up the colour saturation!
 
Crt Jakhel
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Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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I saw this on the web:

"The gelation property of egg yolk causes it to thicken or gel when frozen, so you need to give yolks special treatment. If you freeze them as they are, egg yolks will eventually become so gelatinous that they will be almost impossible to use in a recipe. To help retard this gelation, beat in either 1/8 teaspoon salt or 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar or corn syrup per 1/4 cup of egg yolks (about 4 yolks). " http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/eggcyclopedia/f/freezing-eggs

Are you adding these things? If not, how do your yolks behave after thawing?

 
Ghislaine de Lessines
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Crt Jakhel wrote:I saw this on the web:

"The gelation property of egg yolk causes it to thicken or gel when frozen, so you need to give yolks special treatment. If you freeze them as they are, egg yolks will eventually become so gelatinous that they will be almost impossible to use in a recipe. To help retard this gelation, beat in either 1/8 teaspoon salt or 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar or corn syrup per 1/4 cup of egg yolks (about 4 yolks). " http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/eggcyclopedia/f/freezing-eggs

Are you adding these things? If not, how do your yolks behave after thawing?



I haven't tried to use them yet as it is the first year I have tried to freeze them. I'd heard about the possible need to treat them as you describe but others don't seem to do so. It's an experiment. I'll make some banana bread or something today and report back.
 
Leila Rich
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Crt Jakhel wrote: " If you freeze them as they are, egg yolks will eventually become so gelatinous that they will be almost impossible to use in a recipe"

Actually, that rings a bell-separated yolks do become really dry and 'chewy' in the freezer.
Restaurants I've worked in use more yolks than whites, and I've frozen plenty of whites;
you can definitely defrost and whisk them.

Another thing I thought of:
I only separate eggs to whisk whites. Duck egg whites have low globulin levels, and aren't great for baking things that need a lot of 'lift',
so unless there's other reasons not to, maybe just whisk them together?
Mixing the yolks/whites stops the issue Crt refers to, that's for sure.
 
Ghislaine de Lessines
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So the yolks I froze this spring were definitely gelatinous. I used an immersion blender to whisk the yolks and whites back together and continued on with my baking which turned out well.
 
Dale Hodgins
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I often buy spelt bread and other breads that make a tough loaf, for half price at the organic store, when they are ready to expire. Some are rather dry. I make French toast that is then frozen. The stiffest loaf is softened. This could use up a surplus of both eggs and bread, without special processing. It goes into the toaster for a healthy, instant meal.
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That feels good. Thanks. Here's a tiny ad:
Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
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