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Where to Buy Permaculture Food?  RSS feed

 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 572
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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I searched for a thread on this or thread containing this thread, and found nothing (except one thread talking about how you can't buy permaculture food in a store).

I don't need there to be a store, a CSA-type-thingy would do just peachy for me, but I wonder if there's aaaaaaaaanywhere I can get this kind of food in Massachusetts?
leftovers that someone doesn't want?
Places you can go to steal sepp holzer's food?
It'll be a while before my nut trees give me sweet love, and I'm hungry and want to be better nourished.
The only BioDynamic-ish thing I can get around here is yogurt. I appreciate that and am eager for more.

I'm thinking of this thread to be more buyer-focused than seller-focused, like "here's where I get some really good stuff" or "here's how I found a supply," more than "buy my thing because it's great (except if you don't live in New Zealand)". Maybe there are creative outside-the-box solutions people have found to this question? stories about "the one time I had a real peach that tasted 8,000 times better than what you get at the store" and didn't cost what it costs at the farmer's market? here's a really spend-smarter-not-harder CSA model I've found out about?
 
Dave Burton
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Location: Greater Houston, TX US Hardy:9a Annual Precipitation: 44.78" Wind:13.23mph Temperature:42.5-95F
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Maybe, Falling Fruit, Ripe Near Me, or Local Harvest could help.
 
Dayna Williams
Posts: 79
Location: Zone 8, Western Oregon
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If you're an omnivore, have you tried Real Milk and Eat Wild?

Not all of the farms listed will follow Permaculture methods, but they are a big step in the right direction.
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 572
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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It's that time of the year, we're picking our CSA. I'd LOVE my dollars to go to support a truly visionary, David-Blume-level polyculture permaculture garden/farm. Thought I'd bump this post and see if anyone has any leads. The links posted were good but I am wanting to find GREAT!!!
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 572
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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Was in a hurry before, to clarify hte links people posted were helpful but there's still a lot of info that's not up to date on those sites, and a lot of things people know of through word of mouth may not be up on a website, so if you know anything please let me know! Thanks!
Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:It's that time of the year, we're picking our CSA. I'd LOVE my dollars to go to support a truly visionary, David-Blume-level polyculture permaculture garden/farm. Thought I'd bump this post and see if anyone has any leads. The links posted were good but I am wanting to find GREAT!!!
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 572
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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As I've gone through this process I've gotten more clarity on what I want (I think):

--polycultures
--really good mineral content (not just the big ones, the micronutrients)
--leaves the soil better than it was, and the world (that is, doesn't improve soil at expense of something else somewhere else)
--carbon negative or making progress toward it (I am happy to have my money support real forward progress)
--ideally I want a conscious cocreative gardening approach.

Any other things you'd include that I'm not thinking of?

Can it be done? can I find the Ultimate CSA? the Incredible HUSP of CSA's? There's only one way for this farm snob to know--by trying.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
garden master
Posts: 2617
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:--polycultures


On my farm I grow about 60 species of food producing plants, and hundreds of species of weeds in the same space.

Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:--really good mineral content (not just the big ones, the micronutrients)


Who's willing to pay to have that research done?

Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:--leaves the soil better than it was, and the world (that is, doesn't improve soil at expense of something else somewhere else)


I don't know how something like that could be measured... Improved for which species on what timescale? How does one properly account for expenses Or carbon flow?
 
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