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Tortilla Corn and Beans  RSS feed

 
James D Young
Posts: 64
Location: Brantford, ON Canada
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http://www.durgan.org/URL/?CEVNE 8 November 2014 Tortillas Corn and Beans
Eighteen tortillas were made with about 50% mixed beans, with nixtamalized home grown Indian corn, and Maseca, commercial flour to make the right texture. The tortillas were cooked in a cast iron frying pan, and placed in the microwave for one minute to cause ballooning. Th object was to make a convenient bread which can be eaten alone or stuffed with various food as desired.The tortillas are stored in a air tight plastic container kept in the refrigerator until required. They can also be frozen and revived by placing in the microwave for a time.
Here are links to the corn and beans, which were previously prepared.
http://www.durgan.org/URL/?YUNKR 27 October 2014 Pressure Cooking Dried Beans.
http://www.durgan.org/URL/?HPVDY 19 October 2014 Indian Corn Tortillas.Garden to Plate.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Hi, James....I like this idea of beans mixed with the masa for tortillas and want to try it. I was wondering if there might be another way to do that final puff without a microwave as I don't use that appliance....maybe in the oven or back on a hot iron griddle? do you fill them then like a pita bread?
Thanks!
 
James D Young
Posts: 64
Location: Brantford, ON Canada
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Judith Browning wrote:Hi, James....I like this idea of beans mixed with the masa for tortillas and want to try it. I was wondering if there might be another way to do that final puff without a microwave as I don't use that appliance....maybe in the oven or back on a hot iron griddle? do you fill them then like a pita bread?
Thanks!


The micro puff is additional cooking,since it is so simple and available. Sometimes the tortillas puff on he griddle, sort of depending upon the moisture content of the masa. I am new to this tortilla business, so am still experimenting. The stimulus was I wanted to get away from commercial bread. Also I consider the tortilla as being nutritious in small bulk, also I grow the corn. I can now make the tortillas sort of on the fly, and will enlarge the ingredients as I progress.

At the present time I eat the tortilla often by itself and sometimes wrap various cut up food in them. Also fill the hollow in the puff. Tomato, onion, garlic, beans. I am not much of a meat eater, but choice cuts of meat would be suitable.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5858
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
346
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
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Thank you! I plan to try this tomorrow. I envy you your home grown corn, we grow a lot of our food but have never had much luck with corn. So, I buy a bag pf masa as fresh as I can and we use that....we use the tamale masa as a substitute for corn meal in tiny skillet cornbreads.
 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Judith Browning wrote:I was wondering if there might be another way to do that final puff without a microwave as I don't use that appliance....maybe in the oven or back on a hot iron griddle? do you fill them then like a pita bread?


Here in Ladakh, people puff their leavened thick flat bread by either putting it into the glowing red embers of the wood-burning cookstove and turning it with metal tongs, or holding it with tongs directly over the flame of a gas stove.

This bread is made like this: you roll out a ball of leavened wheat dough so that it's about 1/4 inch thick and 6 inches diameter, then sear both sides on a dry hot iron surface, and let it start to heat through. Before it heats all the way through you move it to the puffing location. It puffs up, but then as it cools it sinks back to be about 1/2 inch thick, with holes throughout, and soft crust. Can be stuffed like pita bread, yes.
 
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