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stacking firewood

 
paul wheaton
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S Haze
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Very cool!

I started one of these once but was evidently doing it wrong, and used it up before it got too big. After this year I should never need that much wood again so if it accumulates I'll try again.

If anyone should have interesting and aesthetically pleasing wood piles it should be a permie! Now just need to design it for more than one function.
 
D. Logan
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I remember hearing about these a while back and liked them. The version I saw leaned more towards the traditional (filled with wood rather than using cross beams, barked splits on top instead of a tarp, etc). I will include the video below. As to S. Haze's comment about multiple functions, well it does automatically serve as animal habitat. Beyond that, here is an interesting article about using round wood piles to form an outhouse! Also below, I am including a video about making wood piles more aesthetic. I especially like the owl.





 
Cassie Langstraat
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Wow! I really like those round ones in the video Paul posted.

Found some more videos on how to keep your firewood dry.

This guy is kinda cheesy, but good for beginners.


Not sure I agree with judging someone's character based on their wood pile.... but here is just one
about stacking it without any supports.




Also who doesn't like a good time-lapse video, especially one to a johnny cash song!



Here's a picture of the owl stack from the video D.Logan shared.



Here's another beautiful stack of firewood.. wow:



Aaaaand then there's this guy:



This looks super UNpractical, but it's still pretty. What do you think? Is this even useable?:




I also really like this thread about wood pile stacking functions too.
 
Zenais Buck
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Oh my goodness! The sisters at a monastery i visit frequently stack their wood in this cool beehive fashion. When I tell my husband about it he swears I am hallucinating from all the incense The sisters told me that convection current rising though the central hole causes the wood to dry quickly. Not to mention the great benefit of being able to stack anywhere. When a tree is downed, they cut and stack right there, and move it later when the wood is dry (and therefore lighter)

Here is a pic from Eastern Europe (the monastery i visit is in California, so their stacks are much smaller)


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Wyatt Barnes
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To me the basic rules for piling wood are; 1) keep it off the ground a bit and 2) don't pile it so air can't flow through easily. No piling against walls or other piles of wood if you are drying. There are no rules for piling dried wood other than keep it out of the rain and make it as convenient to get as possible. I do like to look at the artistic piles but to me it is a challenge to get a stable single stick wide pile to stand true without falling over.
 
Richard Gorny
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Here is my small wood shack that serves for storage of wood for nearby sauna. I wonder if I should make some kind of screen/curtain in front, to avoid rain slanting down?

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Wyatt Barnes
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Richard that is the nicest wood storage area I have ever seen. If you are in an area of consistent damp and driving rain a curtain that allows airflow but sheds water would be good. Other than that what you have looks like it will do what is necessary while being aesthetically pleasing.
 
Richard Gorny
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Many thanks Wyatt, the area is dry (pine forest on sands) and average rainfall is 500-600 mm, but we do have periods when it is raining for few days constantly, and this strage faces prevailing winds direction (great for airflow needed for drying, but bad for slanting down). I think I will make an openwork curtain of some sort, that should do the trick.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Landon Sunrich
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I haven't seen this mentioned and it looks like there are far more advanced techniques going on here, but if you stack it so that the butt end is facing the direction of the prevailing winds then the wind does a lot of the work for you. Especially if it's stacked in near full sun. Just make sure its not to high and rickety or it will topple over and maybe on top of you!

Anyhow. Awesome. Some real pro shit here.

*gasp*

Sorry Nuns!
 
Zenais Buck
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Landon Sunrich wrote:

Anyhow. Awesome. Some real pro shit here.

*gasp*

Sorry Nuns!


You just made me snort coffee out of my nose!
I needed a great laugh this morning, thanks!
 
Rob Viglas
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Man, those are some beautiful stacks!

A couple of things I've learned, from those who've been stacking a lot longer than me, here in Vermont, are to run your stack north to south so that both ends get sun and if you don't have a woodshed or old metal roofing to cover it, stack the last layer bark side up to help keep some of the rain/snow from getting deeper into the stack. They've both worked well for me for the last 13 yrs.

I love splitting and stacking wood so much that there are times that I wish I needed more than 2 cords to heat my house for the winter!
 
Dale Hodgins
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If you don't have adequate cover, create it before you acquire any more wood.
........
My brother is in his 7th year of burning wet wood in a giant wood hog that has air controls that don't work. I've appealed to his girlfriend to stop the waste and pollution.
 
Matt Banchero
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If you need the space or want a project then stacking wood is fine, but it's really unnecessary. Stacked wood by it's nature has less void space and thus less air flow than a jumbled pile. Also, wood gets more expensive every time you handle it. Maybe you're cutting and splitting for yourself, but how much do you value your own time?

You can put a tarp or several pallets down, make a tall pile of your split wood, tarp when raining, uncover when it's sunny, wait for 18 months if you can.

If you're using large quantities of wood or selling, make your piles in wind rows at right angles to the prevailing wind. Evaporation is largely a function of air flow rather than heat.

If you are able to cut the trees and leave them in the woods for a month or two with the branches and leaves on the wood will dry out much faster. Trees have 150 million years of evolution giving them a very efficient mechanism for transpiring moisture, be permie and take advantage of natures plan. (Be careful if you're in areas with invasive pests. Pine beetles would love to come into your wood lot if you leave trees laying around in the wrong season)

Wood will only dry to the average ambient humidity. If you live under redwoods it doesn't matter how long you store your wood it will never dry to less than 30% moisture content.

Fresh green wood is 40-60% MC depending on the species and the season it was cut. 20% MC is considered seasoned, 15% MC can really be called dry, kiln dried wood gets down to 12% MC any less than than that and you're getting diminishing returns for the energy invested in the kiln. The wood will quickly absorb water from the air again anyways.

A moisture tester can be purchased for less than $20 and is a fun toy.
 
Dale Hodgins
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I have lots of salvaged chain link fencing. A circle of this material would make an instant wood shed. A foot of rock in the bottom, would allow air flow and prevent wicking of soil moisture.
 
Morgan Barker
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That would be a great use for chain link fencing.
I have a giant jumble pile in front of my house from a 3 day splitting marathon that I need to stack for next season. I was thinking of round like in Paul's original post, but hollow, stacked around the trunks of two big conifers that have been limbed up about 6'. It stays pretty dry under the trees and gets morning and some afternoon sun. I want to add door and window openings so the breeze and my two little hurricanes can play in it. I am not worried about the safety of that, and nobody else should be either, I split wood really small (can you say J√łtul?).
I had a stabilizing idea that would involve old rope and use it in the same manner as one would employ barbed wire in an earth bag structure. Just coil it around on top of a course every so often.
 
Morgan Barker
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i tied the rope to a thick runner in the doorway pallet about a foot off the ground after the logs reached that height all the way around. I laid the rope along that course, periodically wrapping a turn around a log to create deadman logs every few feet. When I got to the other pallet, I tied it into the corresponding runner and brought it up to the next runner. I stacked courses of wood until I reached the rope and then made another pass around with the rope. Very little effort was involved and the rope is not any worse for the wear(it wasn't a good rope anymore, not for hoisting at work anyway). I have a few more feet to stack but I ran out of stove length stuff to split for the day.
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Woodpile/fort
 
Skjoldr Draugarson
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Some very interesting styles and 'art' in the posts above!

I must say Morgan that I love your idea! Serves several purposes all at once and keeping the wee ones happy is a big added bonus. Mine are jealous already and now want to try out the same.
 
Morgan Barker
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And one day after stacking my firewood, I open the newspaper and find this:
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