new video
hot off the press!  
    more about rocket
mass heaters here.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Metal working  RSS feed

 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1432
Location: Central New Jersey
40
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think this needs to be broken into two basic categories right off
Cold working and hot working.

Cold working is most of tournament metal work and includes cutting and grinding skills as well as bending and forming and joining by crimping, riveting, bolts, or screws. Minimal if any use of heat for working the metal.

Hot working includes black smithing and all the forms of welding, plus the hot forming of sheet metal.

Making a knife from an old file might be a good hot working project.

Making a watering trough might be a good cold working project.

Making your own forge would be an example of an advanced hot working project. (That would actually not use much in the way of hot working skills, but is really a basic skill for a blacksmith)

A solar oven might be an example of a more advanced cold working project.

You could combine the two for shovels and spades.
 
Joel Bercardin
Posts: 251
Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good intro thoughts, Peter.

Peter Ellis wrote:I think this needs to be broken into two basic categories right off
Cold working and hot working.
...
Hot working includes black smithing and all the forms of welding, plus the hot forming of sheet metal.

Just wanted to add that hot working, besides welding, can: a) be done without forge; b) be done with a torch. For certain applications, those who do not have a forge or ready access to one via a neighbor or something can make do. I use an oxy-acetylene (O/A) setup for this - but other oxy-fuel setups (oxygen-propane, oxygen-gasolene, etc) are sometimes used. I use the torch, a vise, hammers, tongs, pliers, etc with flat-bar stock, round-bar, etc. For some shaping I'll put a piece of pipe firmly into my vise and bang the yellow-hot metal around that, since I have no anvil horn. I have no anvil at all, but I do have a 20" section of large I-beam and a shorter section of railroad rail.

Still a forge is desirable if you can acquire or build one. It's the capital investment for a moderate size forge that has stopped me. Acetylene is kinda expensive to use with the torch, but it's also involves ongoing expense when most guys these days seem to use propane to run their forges - not that you have to (coal, oxygen-charged charcoal, etc). With a forge you have the cost of buying it or building it, plus it requires some room in the shop or shed, plus cost for the fuel. So I use my torch.
 
Marianne Cicala
gardener
Posts: 676
Location: south central VA 7B
82
bee books forest garden fungi solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know if seperating it would really be beneficial since both approaches are often used on 1 piece. Many times you start hot and finish cold.
 
jesse markowitz
Posts: 151
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for getting this started Peter!
 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1432
Location: Central New Jersey
40
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think it important to keep them separate. Feedback helps make my point .

For example, I cannot think of an example where hot work is involved in making ductwork. You don't need hot work for roofing or making gutters. Stock tanks can be made with no hotwork.

Hot work does not require a forge, quite true. To my knowledge most hot forming of sheet metal is done using torches, for several reasons. It is typically bar and round stock where a forge comes into its own.

Hammer skills cross over and can be learned either way, but adjusting for the different way metals behave under the hammer when hot or cold is a skill set itself. Likewise, when working hot you need to know when to stop and reheat and when working cold you need to be aware of work hardening.

Sure they overlap. I think they are different enough to treat separately. Out in the world the trades certainly break it out into lots of pieces.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!