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writing spiders will they stay or will they go

 
cameron johnson
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
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For the past couple of years banana spiders and writing spiders have become common place around my backyard and garden which are pretty much one in the same. This past summer I had a writing spider decide to call my black krim tomato plants home, since I try to be as organic as I can be I was very happy to have her their and she did her job very well I never saw her without a stinkbug in her web. But of course as spiders do she past away at the end of the season but not before she created three different egg sacks around the garden. My question is do these types of spiders take to the wind and move on or do they just crawl out and repopulate the same area, my thinking is they will return since she seemed to have found the garden a nice place to spend her life and reproduce and I have noticed that writing spiders in other parts of the yard tend to move and create a new web every couple of days and yet she spent her life in one spot. I am really hoping they stay because I have a huge stinkbug population and that is what she fed on and if they stay I would have my own personal organic stinkbug fighting army, and I don't know about all of you but I have no fear of these spiders even though they are very large, I would rather be surrounded by them in the garden than the stinkbugs. Anyways the main question do you think they will stay or will they go?? Its funny if the picture displays the same on other computers thats pretty much actually life size
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writing spider
 
james Apodaca
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Nice, I had a spider similar to that build it's house across my sliding glass door. After my wife walked into it I was sufficiently motivated to move it so I picked up a garbage can lid and pushed it through the web so it would stick to the lid. With a little bit of fruit in the lid it attracted plenty of bugs for her to eat..

She eventually crawled out of the lid and made a new web, complete with giant egg sack on some oak saplings.. We monitored her for a while until she died.. and we never actually saw the egg sack produce anything.. so sadly, I've got no input on that point. To this day I have yet to see another in my yard.



 
Bryant RedHawk
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It has been my experience that when the babies hatch, most will move on but a few will stick around. this is true of most web spinners.
 
Matu Collins
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Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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My experience has been similar to Bryant's. The spiders will populate the area to the point that they have plenty of prey and territory. Some will move on, some will be eaten by the others.

Our spider population is very healthy, we have many different kinds occupying many different spots. Last year was a super boom spider year, every morning walking around the farm we'd be walking into webs all over the place.
 
cameron johnson
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
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I am thinking about moving two of the three egg sacs to the west side of the garden since that is the direction the wind usually comes from so maybe it would increase the chance that if and when they take to the wind it would increase the chances of them landing back in the garden again.
 
Dan Boone
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It seems your garden is good habitat for this kind of spider, so I would expect (one way or another) that they will continue to inhabit this niche for you.
 
Craig Dobbelyu
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cameron johnson wrote:I am thinking about moving two of the three egg sacs to the west side of the garden since that is the direction the wind usually comes from so maybe it would increase the chance that if and when they take to the wind it would increase the chances of them landing back in the garden again.


Just my two cents here but if the spider did such a good job with all of her other duties, she's likely placed the egg cases in the right places to make the best use of the space come spring time. I'd leave them be to see what happens. Best of luck
 
cameron johnson
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
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You know Craig you are probably right, I am trying to do things the way mother nature would do it so I think Ill leave them be and just see what happens come spring.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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