• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Exciting Permaculture Project For Enthusiasts and experts----Remote Global Permaculture

 
Sara Khan
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi

I am super passionate regarding permaculture . I have arranged a small land for permaculture but the problem is neither do I know permaculture myself nor do I am finding any relevant expert in my country.

But I have to make a small food and vege forest. I have an idea that those who are expert of permaculture here at this forum they can guide me remotely. Please I am waiting for your input. Let's say I show you my land through internet and you guys guide me step by step from A-Z through Skype or any other live call or interaction system.

I think it would be an exciting idea and not troublesome for anyone because it will be done step by step and in phases. Waiting for a real time adventure if some adventurists out there.
 
Sara Khan
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kindly reply. There are lots of experts and enthusiasts here at this forum but no one is replying me.
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1556
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
42
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sara - you haven't given enough information for anyone to make a meaningful comment here. Climate, country, soil conditions, size etc... all come in to play (lots of people add this to their profile so it appears on the left of every post) and asking people to commit to your project without a lot more info is unlikely to be fruitful. Also, the point of these forums is essentially to spread permaculture knowledge - everyone here is trying to learn, often over a prolonged period of time as they experiment with their parcels of land and work out which techniques work for them and which don't.

If you learn the skills yourself you will find your project much more rewarding than having someone design it for you, and over time you are much more likely to succeed as you will be able to recognise issues and adapt to them. Permaculture landscape design also definitely involves site visits over extended periods of time to observe the land through the seasons - there is no real substitute for first hand knowledge and experience of this.

And finally, those who are top notch in this field charge considerable sums for designing and setting up permaculture establishments... they earn their livelihoods from it, so are unlikely to give you a full service for free.

I really think that trying to learn this yourself would be the best path for you - don't be afraid to ask lots of questions here (specific ones pertaining to concepts you are struggling with, methods you might want to try etc...) everyone is very helpful. In addition try and get hold of some of the good texts on the subject. The Permaculture Designers manual is dense but definitely worth a cover to cover read through. Also, sign up for geoff lawton's website and view his videos for some inspiration (and more on youtube).

Mike
 
Sara Khan
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for your time and reply. Yes I haven’t give any info about soil type etc etc . because I assumed that it would be at a later stage when some people would finally agree to join me in this live adventure. I have been trying to search permaculture experts in my country for the last three months but I am unable to find any in Pakistan and training from abroad I could not afford that much money.
During this time I have been constantly reading material and videos etc but you must agree that for a beginner it’s really overwhelming because there are lots of lots of information on that. Moreover I can’t learn unless and until I do it myself. So instead of giving up I thought if learners and lovers of permaculture help me collectively then it would be another adventurous project for some other learners as well because we can also document all details here for every one’s interest.
I am such excited and eager to do it that I have arranged a land as well but alas no matter how hard I have been trying but I am getting no help.

My idea is just to learn but you can say it’s a learning from distance with you people help. I just have a land approximately 126 square meter. The minimum land for permaculture required is about 100 sq meter. So this is nice piece of land to start with. The land is fertile with ideal climate.

Instead of theory it would be a practical kind of project for all people. Let’s say first I will upload the picture of land then can you guide me the first step. Theoretically I have learnt most of the basic things but I am eager to see my permaculture food forest in reality. kindly help me believe you me it will be of interest to everyone.
 
kyle saunders
Posts: 44
Location: Sackville/Graywood, Nova Scotia
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sara,

I'd say the first thing you should do is to start applying what you do know.

You might think that you don't know very much, but if you've been reading as much as you say you have I would guess you can do it. It is clear that you are interested, and the land you have acquired should be your focus. There are many, many great ideas that you could apply to any piece of land, big or small. You just need to start applying them.

Worried you'll make a mistake? Well, you will. And even years down the road you'll still be making mistakes. But you'll learn a tonne, and more often than not you'll succeed!I don't think permaculture was ever meant to be a rigid, by the books, coded, and regulated way to grow foods. There is a lot of room for personal influence and I think your own goals will guide you to a "finished" project you can be proud of.

But to answer your question in the way you asked, I think the first step would be water. Do you have water on your land? Is there any way to store water? Is the water easy to get from its source to the plants that need it?



But as the others say above, and I agree with them, you'll need to share a lot more info before you can get the help you're looking for. It seems like you are trying to get a one-on-one teaching experience, but the point of these forums seem to be group advice and suggestions.

So far you have told us the land size(126m²), the soil is fertile and that the climate is ideal.

What are your goals? Are you trying to grow food for yourself? for a family? for sale?

Other than growing food, what else would you like to see this piece of land used for?
 
Sara Khan
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks dear for such motivation and In the mean while I also searched some good you tube channel for perma as well. You see in my country you tube is not working but to learn I am using VPN and its slow but still I am happy that at least I can see practical applications of permaculture which i was not getting from anywhere?

What I want to do with land? Honestly I have no idea what to do with food or land but I am super excited with permaculture only. I dont want to stand first in my first experiment but at the same time I dont afford to fail because i have taken land from someone to see permaculture in reality. I wonder why people are ignoring such brilliant concepts, why eating pesticides when experts and nature lovers worked so hard , researched and gave this world a really wonderful way to grow organic fruits, vegies plants etc. I just fell in love with it and what i love i do it. So I will InshaAllah with the help of you all will succeed. Thanks dear.
 
Tina Paxton
Posts: 283
Location: coastal southeast North Carolina
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sara Khan wrote:Thanks for your time and reply. Yes I haven’t give any info about soil type etc etc . because I assumed that it would be at a later stage when some people would finally agree to join me in this live adventure. I have been trying to search permaculture experts in my country for the last three months but I am unable to find any in Pakistan and training from abroad I could not afford that much money.
During this time I have been constantly reading material and videos etc but you must agree that for a beginner it’s really overwhelming because there are lots of lots of information on that. Moreover I can’t learn unless and until I do it myself. So instead of giving up I thought if learners and lovers of permaculture help me collectively then it would be another adventurous project for some other learners as well because we can also document all details here for every one’s interest.
I am such excited and eager to do it that I have arranged a land as well but alas no matter how hard I have been trying but I am getting no help.

My idea is just to learn but you can say it’s a learning from distance with you people help. I just have a land approximately 126 square meter. The minimum land for permaculture required is about 100 sq meter. So this is nice piece of land to start with. The land is fertile with ideal climate.

Instead of theory it would be a practical kind of project for all people. Let’s say first I will upload the picture of land then can you guide me the first step. Theoretically I have learnt most of the basic things but I am eager to see my permaculture food forest in reality. kindly help me believe you me it will be of interest to everyone.


Sara,

From one newbie to another, I totally understand how you feel. It is overwhelming! There is so much information that it can be mind boggling to try to figure out what to do first, second, third. And, the cost of formal training is outrageous, at least for me. Here in the US, even here in the Southern USA (most US Permies seem to be in the North or West of the country), there are trained folks with PDCs but to get them to do a Permaculture design is, again, cost prohibitive. (Not slamming them since they had to pay for their training so "a worker is worth their hire". It's just that I can't afford to hire a worker.) But, I think that is actually a good thing. Why? Because it is forcing me to go outside my comfort zone and take risks. Even after asking questions here on the permies.com and after running ideas past a friend with a PDC, ultimately, I have to take a deep breath and EXPERIMENT. I think Paul Wheaton says "do 100 things to find the one thing that works" or something like that. Seems like a waste of effort if someone else has already done that, right? Well, no not really because 1) you might succeed where they failed and 2) you learn about your property and yourself in the process.

Now, I did just find this last night: Free Permaculture Class so that might help you begin to teach yourself. And, find a couple of ideas that you think might work, and try them. Then, try a few more. The Hanging Gardens weren't built in a day and neither will your permaculture garden.
 
Sara Khan
Posts: 8
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dear Tina thanks really for giving me boost. I wish you lots of luck. Yes the link you have sent me is really great I just discovered it yesterday and i received my free lectures I have completed lesson one just one hour before. One day we all become expert permaculturists. Then we will read these posts and smile.
 
kyle saunders
Posts: 44
Location: Sackville/Graywood, Nova Scotia
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey again Sara!

Another thought that I think would send you down a path of good practice is to become more familiar with your local and native plants and trees.

Of course you'll likely want to focus on native foods/fruits, but all plants native to your area should be considerably easy to fill your permaculture garden with. (except maybe some pest/weedy species

You said to me that you don't know what you want to do with your plot but that you want to do good permaculture as the main point of the project, especially to show others that it can be done. I think this in itself is very important, and when I think of projects like this I consider them to be an "educational and experimental example". So, perhaps, instead of focusing just on the physical qualities of this garden you might want to organize in your mind what you want your garden to provide socially. Maybe have a small area for the community to experiment with your ideas, maybe see if you can organize some work parties. Making signs and providing information will go a long way to making your point and message reach more people.

Anyway, I'm interested in your work and hope you do well! Whatever country you're doing this from, greetings from Canada! Take care.
 
Michael Qulek
Posts: 148
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think you could start out with quantifying some numerical data about your area. Please tell us....

Your general geographic location...
Your allitude...
How many mm of rain falls in your area...
Does your plot face east, west, north, south...
Is the soil thick, thin, rocky, clay, sandy?
How many hours of sun fall on the plot per day?
What part of the year does precipitation fall...
What are your winter low temperatures?
What crops do your local farmers grow?
What is the habitat type of the surrounding area, ie:desert brush, chaparral, grassland, woodland, broadleaf forest, conifer forest?

Answer each of these questions, and many of us here can give you meaningful advice.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic