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Miles and miles of free fencing.  RSS feed

 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Today,  I salvaged about 200 feet of seven foot tall chain link fence.  The galvanizing is almost completely worn off some areas,  but it's a thick gauge and should last for years. Sometimes, a perfectly good fence needs to come down at the wire is not rusty.

I got it from the region's largest fence building company. They usually scrap the fencing that they take down. They were reusing the posts on this job, so I just got the wire and the top rail.

In good conditions, it's possible to salvage about 50 feet of this heavy material per hour.  That includes cutting the wire free from the posts, cutting it to manageable length,  pulling all of the organic material from the fence and rolling it up.

I'm going to keep working with them until I get all of the fencing that I need for the farm. 

This opportunity exists in most metropolitan areas and even in some small towns. A person could get more than enough firewood,  building wood,  and fencing, by clearing the way for fencing companies. It's a good job for a jack of all trades. It involves tree cutting,  hedge cutting, and general landscaping skills,  along with some rudimentary metalworking skills.

The next time I find myself unemployed for a time,  I will call all of the fencing companies and offer my services.
...... Photos .....
The photo shows about 1/3 of the fencing. Because it's quite heavy,  I cut it in 30 foot sections.

I use the antifreeze bottle in place of a pylon,  whenever I'm loading my truck where there's vehicle traffic.
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Andrew Parker
pollinator
Posts: 514
Location: Salt Lake Valley, Utah, hardiness zone 6b/7a
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A timely subject. My backyard neighbor is planning on replacing our fence (at her expense). She will be paying a guy $1.50/ft to tear down the fence. That price is about half the going rate. He discounts because he salvages what he can to use making things to resell. He usually subcontracts for installers.

I don't know as I have ever seen a chain link fence torn down around here, unless it was to upgrade. Metal lasts forever in this climate, unless it gets salt on it. Exposed wood turns to styrofoam in fifteen or twenty years because of the extremes in temperature and humidity.
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1455
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Great find! In my experience top rail is stronger than posts anyway .
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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The toprail is super thick and it has a good layer of zinc on it still. I wonder how difficult it would be to galvanize the wire. It's a little rusty.

I'm trying to come up with other uses for this product. One of them would be to use it to hold stone onto the side of a building. I have a steep area where my tenant's ATV is tearing up the ground.  I could put some fencing down and peg it. Then there's the many uses for gabions.
 
Andrew Parker
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Posts: 514
Location: Salt Lake Valley, Utah, hardiness zone 6b/7a
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I saw a fence made with welded wire and broken stone. It was like a long skinny gabion. If you line a gabion with geotextile, you can fill it with dirt to make a quick wall. There are rapidly deployable systems (expensive) that are used to make military and emergency shelter. So many options with gabions. Let your imagination run wild.

Are the top rails bendable? If so, you might be able to repurpose them as hoop house frames.

Could you treat the chain link in an acid bath to remove the rust? You may just want to paint over it and hope for the best.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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The toprail is not easily bent.

There was a lot of monkeying around with the fence.

By the time I got everything rolled up and packed, I had eight hours into 300 feet of fence. Judging from how the truck is sitting, I'm guessing that I have 1200 pounds of wire and rails.

It was a good test run and I've determined that it wouldn't be worth doing the sort of job just for the fencing.

The owner of the lumberyard came out and asked if it was worth it. I told him probably not, but it was a good test. He's a guy who I've known for several years. He informed me that the fence company had knocked off a couple hundred because I was tearing down the old one. Then he invited me into the store to pick out $200.00 worth of free tools. He's a Makita dealer. Brian is an alright guy.

  Here is my new cordless reciprocating saw.

Some of the fence is quite rusty and some has plenty of galvanizing left.

I got a good heavy load on.
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Dale Hodgins
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Fencing can be pinned directly to the ground when the area is steep and there are loose rocks in danger of tumbling down. This is done along highway embankments.

The same, could be done when there is a house at the bottom of a revine or if there is some other thing that you don't want damaged by bouncing rocks.

The fencing could be used to hold back organic materials on eroded slopes.  The wire could eventually be removed, or it could be allowed to rust into the soil after plants take over. Many areas need iron.
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These rolls are quite heavy,  so I slide them out of the back of the truck and place one end on the pile, and then lift the other end and swing at around. I roll each one onto this board and then slide them out. I used the same board when putting them into the vehicle.
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elle sagenev
Posts: 1282
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Union Pacific was replacing all their phone poles and we got quite a few of the old ones for free, delivered to our house. They usually have to pay to have the taken at a dump but since we allowed them to just dump them on our property, all free. Better than free actually since we've been able to scavage a fair amount of copper, scrap metal and those insulator things that sell fairly well on Ebay. The plan is to cut them into lengths we can use as fence poles, poles for various structures, etc. Lots of good building material there!!!
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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I'm trying to come up with as many uses for this fencing as possible, since it appears there's an endless supply.

My soil is about 15% rock. The easiest way for me to gather rock,  is to dump it through a big sifter that is laid against a hugelkultur mound with the excavator and gather the rock that rolls to the bottom.

The next small building that I construct will be built using gabions made from the wire and rocks.

I'm using one building material to gather the other and getting sifted soil onto the hugelkultur in the process.

Stacking functions,  soil and rock.
 
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