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barter what are things worth  RSS feed

 
Betty Lamb
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Location: Vancouver Island, Zone??
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In a barter system, what would people trade an ounce of silver for? I know the monetary value of silver is not much, $26.00 where I live. But the actual value is what?

What would you trade for an ounce of silver?
 
John Wolfram
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Well, I can't eat silver, can't smoke it, and a bar of silver has no entertainment value..much like dollar bill. It does nothing other than wait for the next person to buy it so one could think of it as a currency substitute and trading it is not actually bartering.
 
Dan Boone
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Silver is a metal of beauty, that is (relatively) easy to work into jewelry and small decorative items. It's also chemically very useful (for instance in making photographic films, a technology now mostly obsolete but not without its residual utility.)

I'm not a jeweler so I can't say what I'd trade an ounce of silver for. An hour or two of labor, surely, which is another way of saying that the current market price isn't so far out of whack.

 
R Scott
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If you want to go down this rabbit hole, the most valuable way I know of to barter silver is as colloidal silver.
 
Dan Boone
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Yeah, but I don't want to become a smurf.
 
R Scott
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You have been down this rabbit hole further than I have...
 
Hans Harker
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There's certain 'magic' in precious metals that may be coming from the time they were created in the explosion of the supernova or something like that. They just feel attractive. They make nice gifts that way.

They also seem to hold some value in times of serious financial upheavals so they may be treated as a safety device. But it seems also that the precious metal market has been subjected to a significant amount of manipulation.

I'd say seeds seem to be most 'permacultural' currency so trading silver for seeds would make most sense to me in that perspective.
 
Su Ba
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Personally, nothing. I'd trade for a dozen eggs before I'd trade for silver.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Voy Grabiec wrote:I'd say seeds seem to be most 'permacultural' currency so trading silver for seeds would make most sense to me in that perspective.


In 1860 when my family settled in my village, a packet of seeds cost a silver dime. I am still asking the same price 154 years later.
 
Hans Harker
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
Voy Grabiec wrote:I'd say seeds seem to be most 'permacultural' currency so trading silver for seeds would make most sense to me in that perspective.


In 1860 when my family settled in my village, a packet of seeds cost a silver dime. I am still asking the same price 154 years later.


If the production worker compensation is used as a base for comparison a dime in 1860 was worth ~36 todays dollars.

The price of seed comparing to the value of $ dropped dramatically. And even more comparing to the value of silver - about 2grams of silver that a dime was made of is worth about $1 today.

That tells me that humanity is incredibly wealthy these days in terms of availability and variety of seeds available.
 
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