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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
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Eric: Right off looks like a computer fan and heatsink. Give us a few more angles, and a size?
 
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Unless the connector is very unusual & deceptive it's a small circuit board with a lot of heat sink & what appears to be a fan. Probably a power supply or power amp. Possibly a specialized microprocessor. Flip it over please ... let's check under the hood!
 
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Hi Pearl, it's about 3 inches by 1 inch. It is true what you what regarding the heat sink. They can really heat up !
 
Pearl Sutton
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Need help remembering what these racks are for. I have 2 of them, 14 inches wide, 10 inches high, 1.5 inches between the racks and the wall when they are like they are in the pic. What I think I remember is they orient like they are in the pic, Y top up. Something slides down in the crack and is kept there. My head is all tangled up with coffee cup racks, that's not it, but I can't recall what they hold. I want to say they are restaurant stock stuff. Not sure of that. Any help?

 
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Looks like a wine glass rack, turned on its side. ..
 
Pearl Sutton
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Carla Burke wrote:Looks like a wine glass rack, turned on its side. ..


WHOO! Apple for Carla, Thank you!! I knew it was something kitcheny!
Labeling them this time :)
:D

Yup, there it is:
 
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As soon as I saw it, I knew that's what it was! Well done gals! But now can we think of alternative uses? A hammer rack? An herb drying rack?
 
Carla Burke
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Small lid rack? Rolled, small towels could fit in it, screwed on the inside of a cabinet door...
 
Jay Angler
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Oh, definitely a rack for face cloths so they don't get lost in with bigger towels - good idea Carla!
 
Carla Burke
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For anyone who sees with a serger, this thing would be fantastic, for organizing those giant thread spools!!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Carla Burke wrote:For anyone who sees with a serger, this thing would be fantastic, for organizing those giant thread spools!!


Oooh, I have a serger I haven't learned to use yet...
 
Mike Barkley
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I don't know what a serger is but I knew that was a wine glass holder. Or is it an opossum hotel?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Mike Barkley wrote:I don't know what a serger is but I knew that was a wine glass holder. Or is it an opossum hotel?



Serger is a type of sewing machine, uses big spools of thread. If you look at the seams in most commercially made clothes, see how they are all kinda zigzagged tight and cut off all neat and close? That is serger work.

Can't be a possum hotel, they demand more closed in space. But if it was, the picture would have looked more like this:


This has been your weirdness education for the day! :D
 
pollinator
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Need help remembering what these racks are for. I have 2 of them, 14 inches wide, 10 inches high, 1.5 inches between the racks and the wall when they are like they are in the pic. What I think I remember is they orient like they are in the pic, Y top up. Something slides down in the crack and is kept there. My head is all tangled up with coffee cup racks, that's not it, but I can't recall what they hold. I want to say they are restaurant stock stuff. Not sure of that. Any help?



They hold wine glasses, stem up, in a bar. Usually mounted under a cabinet or pass-thru Easy to wash glassware & hang to dry/store for use.
 
Mike Barkley
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Hard to tell.
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Pearl Sutton
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Hahaha... ok, I have to admit, you COULD use that rack for a possum hotel! I didn't recall they can hang, the ones I see are always on the ground.
And earlier my head was singing "Since my raccoon left me, I found a new place to dwell, it's down at the end of Permies street at Possum Hotel..."

 
Carla Burke
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Hahaha... ok, I have to admit, you COULD use that rack for a possum hotel! I didn't recall they can hang, the ones I see are always on the ground.



Ha! The ones I see are usually rather flat, stinky, and kinda... smushed along the road, a bit...
 
Pearl Sutton
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Carla Burke wrote:
Ha! The ones I see are usually rather flat, stinky, and kinda... smushed along the road, a bit...


The ones I see are big, fat, slow and on the porch, eating anything the chickens declined. Or smushed :) Haven't seen one in a tree yet, or up anything. Seen them coming out of holes in the ground, like the woodchucks. Definitely haven't seen any hanging from wine glass racks!! :D Maybe I need to open a Possum Hotel to see that. I already run a Possum Restaurant on the porch, so the clientele is available.
 
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We don't have these. They look so cute!
 
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Can anyone identify this weird thing? It looks sort of like a wrench. Someone I know posted this image on Facebook.
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Mike Barkley
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Looks like a connecting rod for a piston.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Mike beat me to it! Apple for Mike!
Piston connecting rod. it's what connects the crankshaft to a piston in a car engine.
When you see it here it makes more sense. The pistons is held on by a bar that goes through the smaller hole. the crankshaft goes through the bigger one.
Trivia: if your connecting rods don't all weigh the same, your engine will not run well due to the imbalance. When one of these breaks, that's what's called "throwing a rod." So if your mechanic says you threw a rod, one of those things broke. And it's hard to reach it to replace it, that's why it costs so much to repair. Every car engine has as many of those as it has pistons, so if you have a V8 engine, you have 8 rods. if you have a 4 cylinder engine, it has 4 of them.


 
Ryan M Miller
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That was fast. Most of the replies to the photo on facebook also suggested the item was a connecting rod from a submarine.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ryan M Miller wrote:That was fast. Most of the replies to the photo on facebook also suggested the item was a connecting rod from a submarine.



A submarine? Well, possibly. Any crankshaft/piston engine has them.  
I'd say the facebook crowd has never rebuilt an engine :)  (Esp not in their kitchen, which is where I tend to... :D )  Pretty obvious if you have ever gotten out a wrist pin what the rod looks  like. (Wrist pin is the thing that goes through the small hole, holds the piston on, they can be evil to remove.)
 
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I found this sweet wooden box at my favorite thrift store this morning.  

The lady at the check out (who charged me 25 cents) insisted it was a jewelry box...I don't think so though as it opens flat and everything would fall out.  

I'm assuming it held some sort of 'tool' or something?  We cannot read the lettering within the oval on the lid...I've tried a pencil rubbing and magnifying and it's just almost but not quite there.  There are some impressions in the velvet lining but nothing that indicates any obvious shape, at least to me.  Two of the worn places look like something might have been screwed in there or at least there is a small hole into the wood and an impression around the hole.

I love the brass hinges...and the finger joints!

The measurements are  6.5" X 3.25"
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Mike Barkley
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The velvet lining indicates it might be for a musical instrument or scientific equipment.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Judith: that is what the attachments for old sewing machines came in! I have one that came with my treadle machine. Button hole makers etc



Edit: Ooh, this pic shows all the pieces parts better!

 
Judith Browning
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wow!  thanks Pearl!
I am so relieved...I tend to spend too much time investigating and this one had me stumped.  

I was thinking one large thing rather than many, more along the lines of Mike's suggestion.

I'm going to check out my old treadle's drawer...lots of loose attachments there and maybe they'll fit or even my 1949 electric that has a just a cardboard box for those parts.

 
Jay Angler
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That's cool! I was looking at it thinking - I've seen something like this before and I'll swear it was related to an old sewing machine - glad to see that Pearl was already on top of it!
 
Carla Burke
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Wow, Pearl! Must be the week of the old sewing machines! Sunday night, we came home from my mom's, in KY, with my great aunt's old sewing machine. She'd motorized it, but kept the treadle on. I'm going to revert it, to treadle-only, and get rid of that new - fangled motor & pedal. I'll find another use, for that! But, I love that old attachment box - way cool!
 
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Does anyone know what this one is? I am stumped!
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It looks to me like some sort of crimping tool. The one end turns (with the aid of a wrench or socket) which bears down on the other end which does the crimping. It also looks like (by the small allen key bolt) as if the end can be exchanged with various other ends to do different tasks.
 
Carla Burke
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Bolt cutter
 
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Looks like a pipe cutting/crimping tool used by plumbers.

 
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On the crimping tool, I am pretty sure my dad had one, but what is it? No clear idea. I did think it might be a portable battery clamp crimper.
But what it really resembles is a nut cracker.
https://m.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200396173_200396173
 
Pearl Sutton
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Wait wait wait. That's not a nut CRACKER on Mike Fedderson's link, it's a nut SPILTTER. From their product info:

Rusted, stripped and down-right stubborn nuts can be a chore to remove. But not when you use this heavy-duty nut splitter, with its self-centering wobble tip and offset design for easier operation. Constructed of drop-forged steel and plated to resist corrosion. Chisel is heat treated.


So it gets off rusted nuts, not cracks mean walnuts. Am I the only one who thought it was walnuts?
And if it breaks rusted nuts to remove them, I want one, I was just pricing an impact wrench to remove some that are kicking my ass.
Apple for Mike Fedderson, for getting the link correct, not sure about what type of nuts intended :)
 
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"Hey there Mr. Policeman, where are you from?"
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Wait wait wait. That's not a nut CRACKER on Mike Fedderson's link, it's a nut SPILTTER. From their product info:

Rusted, stripped and down-right stubborn nuts can be a chore to remove. But not when you use this heavy-duty nut splitter, with its self-centering wobble tip and offset design for easier operation. Constructed of drop-forged steel and plated to resist corrosion. Chisel is heat treated.


So it gets off rusted nuts, not cracks mean walnuts. Am I the only one who thought it was walnuts?
And if it breaks rusted nuts to remove them, I want one, I was just pricing an impact wrench to remove some that are kicking my ass.
Apple for Mike Fedderson, for getting the link correct, not sure about what type of nuts intended :)


Yaasss! A nut splitter!! I'll throw more apples for you both!!  And lookie here, this one is even the same shape!


 
Jennifer Richardson
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Thank you all for helping solve the mystery of the nut splitter!
 
Mike Feddersen
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Poor choice of words on my part, I indeed meant nut splitter.

So no one wants to help me with the policeman?

With the light sockets on the hands it does appear to be some sort of turn signal indicator. The holes in the hip area could be for wires and string to lift arms. There is one screw left holding the thing together, but I heard trying to refurbish something can effect value. That, and knowing me I would lose pieces.
 
My, my, aren't you a big fella. Here, have a tiny ad:
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
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