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For Jacqueline - magnetic fields and Schuman resonance

 
Shaz Jameson
Posts: 117
Location: Hilversum, Netherlands, urban, zone 7
4
bee toxin-ectomy urban
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Hi Jacqueline,

Like many people here I absolutely loved your podcasts with Paul and i'm looking forward to your book. Your approach is refreshing and as a beginning beekeeper - finished my conventional beginners beekeeping course last year - it turned all I thought I knew on it's head.

You mentioned in the podcast your hypothesis about the queen needing sunlight on her maiden flight and that keeping bees indoors was inhumane (inapiane?).

To go in line with this I was wondering if you've explored the importance of magnetic fields for bees? Theories on the effects of EMF for bees abound, though I suspect that this is just one of the many stresses we've put on the bees.

My question is particularly about the Schuman resonance, a "pulse" that goes between the earths surface and the atmosphereat a rate of 7.83hz. some experiments were done in the 70s with keeping people underground with sun lamps and found that not being bathed in this resonance was damaging for physical and mental health. (i'm currently writing to you from a train commuting home but I hope to find the reference for this later) I'd thought the bees could experience something similar, especially with their heightened sensitivity to magnetic fields.

Have you done any thinking along these lines?
 
Jacqueline Freeman
instructor
Posts: 83
Location: southwest Washington state
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bee cat forest garden trees
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What an interesting question, Shaz!

Let me correct something first on this note, then I'll address your real question.

<<"You mentioned in the podcast your hypothesis about the queen needing sunlight on her maiden flight and that keeping bees indoors was inhumane.">>

Actually what I said was that the queen needs sunlight on both her maiden flight AND her annual swarm flight. The reason for that is that she lives in darkness all year, laying thousands upon thousands of eggs. In her maiden flight she mated with 12-20 drones and is fertile for 5-6 years. She is perpetually pregnant with all that sperm for all those years as long as humans don't screw it up.

Each year a normal colony departs the hive and heads out to look for a new home where they will begin a new colony with their old queen. They left behind a set of baby queen eggs who will hatch out soon after the swarm departs and the left-behind colony will have a new queen.

The OLD QUEEN only mated that one time, yet she stays fertile year after year. The reason she stays fertile is .... (drumroll) because the sun's light on her body recharges her hormones and that perks up her fertility again for another year.

Human-thinking-alert: --- Most beekeepers find swarming to be problematic because the colony significantly slows down on honey production during that time between swarm leaving and young queen and baby bees maturing. If we could only prevent them from swarming, we wouldn't lose so much honey-production time. So, let's prevent swarming.

So we humans decided to initiate a bunch of swarm prevention techniques like doing splits or breaking off queen eggs (a swarm won't leave without knowing new imminent queens are about to hatch), and doing annual queen-replacement. When you ask why a beekeeper will replace their queens annually, they'll often tell you it's because the queen's fertility declines anyway, so she has to be replaced.

But queen replacement is terribly traumatic to the colony who deeply loves their Queen, their real mother. The reason the queen's fertility declines is because she wasn't permitted to swarm and have the sun renew her hormones and fertility. If you keep her in the dark, she can't stay fertile.

It's all very common sense when you look at it this way. Let the colony do what their nature requests of them, and then support the colony's choices. Their nature tells them to swarm annually -- thus keeping the Queen fertile -- so that's what we ought to encourage.

Jacqueline
 
Jacqueline Freeman
instructor
Posts: 83
Location: southwest Washington state
19
bee cat forest garden trees
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Shaz, your question about the Schuman resonance is interesting. Let me ponder that for awhile and see what we come up with. Thanks for being an open-minded thinker!

warmly,
Jacqueline
 
David Livingston
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Location: Anjou ,France
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I remember a big discussion on this subject over on biobees . It was pretty inconclusive as it seemed to come down to a matter of belief Some people thought they could detect Schuman resonance through drowsing . All those who believed they could drowse thought it effected the bees and vice versa
Me I know the bees can detect stuff I cannot - polorised light for example
So I have it down as a possibility but since I cannot drowse of limited use to me
David
 
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