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Breakfast foods for 10 and 13 year old - give me some ideas please!  RSS feed

 
Sheri Menelli
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Anyone have any ideas of breakfast foods for kids - ages 10 and 13. Picky eaters who eat too much processed food? (My husband buys processed stuff - I generally do not)

 
Dan Boone
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Are you trying to compete with salty, sugary, fatty processed breakfast foods? As in, offer nutritional whole foods that they will prefer? Because if so, I think that's a tall order.

There's no breakfast food more wholesome than oatmeal. It can be jazzed up to an extent with berries, nuts, sweeteners, and fats. (Many people like butter, or even cubes of cheese, in their porridge.) But bottom line, if you can't get your husband on the same page with you about the foods that are brought into the home, you probably can't get your kids to routinely eat oatmeal if they have frosted poptarts and frozen sausages as options.
 
Sheri Menelli
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Dan Boone wrote:Are you trying to compete with salty, sugary, fatty processed breakfast foods? As in, offer nutritional whole foods that they will prefer? Because if so, I think that's a tall order.

There's no breakfast food more wholesome than oatmeal. It can be jazzed up to an extent with berries, nuts, sweeteners, and fats. (Many people like butter, or even cubes of cheese, in their porridge.) But bottom line, if you can't get your husband on the same page with you about the foods that are brought into the home, you probably can't get your kids to routinely eat oatmeal if they have frosted poptarts and frozen sausages as options.


Yes, they love their carbs and sugar.

I've gotten a few of them (10 year old twins) to eat the oatmeal. But they get bored. And my 13 year old won't eat it

Great ideas for jazzing it up!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Check out Leah's pictures and recipe for puff pancakes. In our house we called them Dutch babies. My kids loved eating them plain (though that might be an acquired taste) or with fresh fruit and a little honey. My son would eat 3/4th a pan almost every morning when he was just 3 to 4 years old!


 
Julia Winter
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Peanut butter is really good in oatmeal. For years, I would put old fashioned oats with a big handful of mixed nuts and dried fruits, some ground flax seed, and peanut butter in a heavy (hand made) ceramin bowl (don't forget a little salt!). Then I'd put the kettle on to boil and take a shower. The whistling of the kettle would pull me from the shower, and I'd pour the boiling water over the oatmeal fixin's then cover the bowl with a lid and multiple towels (plus a few hot pads layered in). Then I'd go get dressed. When I was ready to go, the oatmeal was ready to eat. I liked it better that way, not as gooey from stirring. I ate it while driving to work.

Popovers are delicious and nutritious - they are like the puff pancakes in a muffin pan.

You can make really good waffles with a combination of chickpea flour and um, I forgot. Some other non-wheat flour. My friend made them for me this weekend and I was surprised how they just tasted like normal waffles (OK, like whole wheat waffles). Anyway, they didn't taste like falafel at all.
 
David Livingston
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I cook porrage with home made jam . Looks pink kids love it also with home made reduced sugar "nutella"

David
 
John Master
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soaked pancakes from the nourishing traditions cookbook are a hit with my boys, they could eat them every morning if I would let them. Noah loves pancakes so I nerded out and found a recipe that is good for them as opposed to an aunt Jemima type concept. Whole organic grains, soaked overnight in kefir (basically yogurt) then in the morning add butter, salt, baking soda and two smashed up bananas, blended well and fried on the griddle. they have either raw honey or real maple syrup or healthy jam.
 
Julia Winter
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I would love to see a picture of those pancakes! Is the grain ever blended into flour? Or goo? Or can you see the individual grains still in the pancakes?
 
Angelika Maier
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If they really love fat and sugar then maybe there's something missing. I realized that all these vegetarians in our school eat a lot of sweet.
It is a lie that fat and saturated animal fat is bad for you. How about fried eggs with bacon and bread? Or better scrambled eggs, we like them with onion or green onion and fresh chili.
Maybe they like fried rice with an egg on the top?
If it is too early for such a thing simply pack them something more for lunch. Many people simply cannot eat in the morning.
I think it is really important to give growing kids enough fat (not oil).
Another trick is to make kids cook themselves. It saves you a lot of time. A good cookbook is a great present. My kids are doing curries at the moment.
 
Roberta Wilkinson
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My first thought on seeing the subject line was homemade granola with plain yogurt and fruit butter or canned fruit (or fresh in season). If you make your own granola, you can cut way down on the sugar over grocery store types. I just use a little honey and maple syrup to a large batch so the main flavors are nutty and toasty with just a hint of sweetness, then the fruit can sweeten the dish to taste. If it's the squishiness of the oatmeal that your 13 year old objects to, the granola might be a better fit.

If a more savory option would be preferred, quiches and fritattas are good hot or cold and are easy to make with whatever scraps and leftovers are on hand. I make my quiche crust right in the pan (1 cup whole wheat flour, dash salt, 1/2 cup softened butter - smash together with your hands, then press into the bottom and up the sides, prick and par bake a bit before filling) so there's no hassle with rolling pins and counter space and flour everywhere. Breakfast burritos are good too, and everyone can mix and match ingredients to have what they like.

For special occasions, everyone loves cinnamon rolls. I make a filling of just ground raisins, rehydrated a bit, with lots of cinnamon and some butter. Dough is a basic bread dough, on the soft side. For icing, cream cheese and milk blended up with some raisins or dates and a little vanilla. You can make similar sweet rolls with other fillings too - any jam is tasty. I made some particularly awesome ones with leftover cranberry sauce the day after Thanksgiving.
 
John Master
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Julia Winter wrote:I would love to see a picture of those pancakes! Is the grain ever blended into flour? Or goo? Or can you see the individual grains still in the pancakes?
Oops, I meant whole grain flour. Look just like regular pancakes but the soaking neutralizes phytic acid and other irritants in the flour, a step the box mixes skip.
 
D. Logan
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There is a recipe in a book called Lip Smackin Backpackin called Cherry Walnut Cous Cous Porridge. The price of the book is worth it for that recipe alone! To this date, I have found no one of any age who doesn't love the stuff. It's filling, it's relatively good for you and it is easy to make. I tend to make it in big batches and then just seal it away for when I feel like having something delicious.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Joseph Lofthouse
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Based on how my body interacts with food, I think that the worst possible thing a person can do to a body is to give it a high carbohydrate breakfast first thing in the morning. Because that sets up a dependency on high carbohydrate foods for the rest of the day...

I have a lot more energy and can do tons more work in a day if I skip breakfast... But if sufficient peer pressure is exerted I'll eat non-carbohydrate foods: jerky, sausage, eggs, cheese, bacon, ham, etc. Protein and fat definitely seem to be the best sort of breakfast for me.

As far as husband buying junk food.... I learned a long time ago that if I want to keep wheat out of my meals that the simplest way to do it is to do the shopping and the cooking.
 
Dale Hodgins
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