new videos
hot off the press!  
    more about rocket
mass heaters here.

more videos from
the PDC here.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

jar pie: keeps for 2 years  RSS feed

 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
a woman i worked for last month told me she cooked pie in her jelly jars 

seals with lid and ring  keeps for 2 years

has anyone tried this  or does anyone have a recipe
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
25
books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No I've never heard of this.... but thanks to your post I searched and found tons of info and recipes - see here http://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&channel=s&hl=en&source=hp&q=pie+in+a+jar&btnG=Google+Search

Yum, even with the heat just now I want to try these cute pies out.  Individual pies, from freezer to oven.

Thanks ♥
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
cool jami thanks
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have heard of doing this with the filling, but not the crust also! wow!
pieinjarjpg.jpg
[Thumbnail for pieinjarjpg.jpg]
out.jpg
[Thumbnail for out.jpg]
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So I see recipes for jar pies that are cute, can you share the recipe for the jar pies that keep for 2yrs?

What is the crust like if the pie is in effect canned?
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thats why i posted this couldn't find a recipe for canning pie

im going to try some just waiting on my seal for my pressure canner
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1351
Location: Cascades of Oregon
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've canned bread before I wonder what the crust will turn out like.
Banana bread ends up being a dense bread pudding consistency when you can it. Even though it is not recommended to just place the lid on after baking the bread I admit I have done it..
Pressure cooking might be a way around the safety issue.
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
25
books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh I see.... the heading of 'jar' pie made me think of something else I had heard of - pies in canning jars, but your looking for how to use canning for making and storing pies.....

I've looked in all my canning info and so far haven't found any mention of 'canning' complete pie, just fillings.  I've also searched on this two year thing looking for urban-legend and found nothing.  Next I went to my survivalist food info and found a lot of strange things being canned, but no fruit pie in a jar  sorry.
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Humm , I think the pies pictures here are baked in a jar, I shared this thread on an other website & the comments there included some one who said they kept pies in a jar for 2 years in the freezer, so perhaps I can get that recipe for us.
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
the lady i worked for cooked the pie then put lid and ring on when they came out of the oven .

letting them seal on there own 

i'm sure they seal but i would pressure can pie .

i was more worried about the crust holding up  while stored
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That seems to be the question; if you actually can it, what becomes of the crust?
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You have to admit, theses are very cute!

Find a recipe for the kind you freeze HERE: http://www.ourbestbites.com/2009/09/single-serving-pie-in-jar.html
jarpies.jpg
[Thumbnail for jarpies.jpg]
apple-pie-free-standing.jpg
[Thumbnail for apple-pie-free-standing.jpg]
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
25
books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Links for freeze-types, including the ones you have pictured here, are all available from the search-results link I provided above, but I'm wondering Dianne have you heard of these 'canned' pies, because I haven't been able to find any examples of such.

Maybe you know of some?  Or maybe someone's great aunt or such can point us in the right direction....?

I agree with you, these freeze now and bake later seem like a wonderful idea, and they are cute!
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You know I have heard the term but am not sure it includes the crust.
But if a steak & mushroom pie can be put in a tin & then baked with the lid removed to crisp the crust it might be possible for a pie in a jar?

Perhaps I should experiment this fall...
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
25
books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hay... your right!

So maybe it is doable - great thinking    Thanks Dianne
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You are welcome, I'll let you all know if I come up with a recipe. D
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
sure sounds doable..let us know how they turn out
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
well first problem can't get the crust to  lay in jar right
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
25
books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
From the recipe for frozen-jar-pie the gal pressed it to the glass, a smooshing sort of.
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i tried that but the sides kept falling before i could get the berries in
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Try adding a little more butter to your crust recipe that might fix it.
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
25
books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
...maybe it's the temperature of the jar and/or crust    Sometimes chilled crust is easier to work with, sometimes a warmed dough is. 
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hmm maybe ill have to keep crust and jar cold , good suggestion ty
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As I thinking back to the beef & mushroom pie in a tin I'm thinking maybe it only had a top crust. I'll be seeing some elders of the clan in a few weeks I'll ask if any of them have heard of a canned pie.
 
                        
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't canned pies but I have canned cakes. They do seal and keep for a very long time. The texture is cake-like and as they age they might be a little on the dry side but a quickly whipped up lemon sauce fixes them right up. They are baked in the jars and then capped. If you do a search on jar cake you should find plenty of recipes. Very handy to have on hand for unexpected visitors.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It might be 'jar pie' season for some!
 
David Livingston
steward
Posts: 3475
Location: Anjou ,France
163
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In Britain you can buy pies in tins so why not in jars ?

David
 
K Nelfson
Posts: 129
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Heat transfer into the filling will be impeded by the flaky crust. And thickeners are generally not recommended for canned goods.


 
K Nelfson
Posts: 129
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
ASimple Girl wrote:I haven't canned pies but I have canned cakes. They do seal and keep for a very long time. The texture is cake-like and as they age they might be a little on the dry side but a quickly whipped up lemon sauce fixes them right up. They are baked in the jars and then capped. If you do a search on jar cake you should find plenty of recipes. Very handy to have on hand for unexpected visitors.


Sorry to be a stick in the mud but this isn't a good idea. Here's some research articles that show how others have tested to see if it works or now. You'll see that the first one basically concludes that you shouldn't do bread in canning jars. The other articles outline the limits on canned bread, which include pH, moisture, and antimicrobial agents (the dread preservatives).

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iafp/jfp/1994/00000057/00000010/art00007

Also, from the 50's

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2621.1951.tb17387.x/abstract

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2621.1954.tb17484.x/abstract

 
R Scott
Posts: 3349
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Breads and pies are usually "done" with an internal temperature well under spore-killing temps, unfortunately.

Not that they would ever last long enough in my house to worry about it...

There should be a way to cook them in a pressure canner and get it safe, but not sure the crust would be edible.
 
K Nelfson
Posts: 129
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Canning times are fast when there's a thin fluid that can circulate around, transferring heat from the hot edges of the jar to the center of the jar. When you must depend on conduction of heat, as in tinned meats, processing times are very long. I read about it in the context of canning tuna in a commercial setting. The slow transfer of heat by conduction is one of the reasons meats are stored in small thin tins.

Now, imagine heat transfer through a layer of puff pastry. The air pockets slow down the heat transfer and I doubt the rate of heat transfer in dry bread is very high.
 
Do not threaten THIS beaver! Not even with this tiny ad:
2017 Rocket Mass Heater Workshop Jamboree - 15 workshops in one event
https://permies.com/wiki/63312/permaculture-projects/Rocket-Mass-Heater-Workshop-Jamboree
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!