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unidentified pink and green clusters on soil  RSS feed

 
Posts: 14
Location: Seattle, WA
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Hi permies,
I've got a sheet mulched bed awaiting my spring vegetable plantings in my backyard. Over the last 2-3 days I've noticed some large colonies of pink and green things that look like tiny eggs but I can't find anything about them anywhere. Wondering if they're something I should be concerned about or if I should leave em be. I'm in the Seattle wa area, if that helps.
Hopefully my pictures attach
Thanks!
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master steward
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ohhh, eggs!

But what kind? Slugs? Frogs? Bugs? Lizards?

They could be good, they could be bad. It's so difficult to say. To me, they look like frog and lizard eggs - But, they may not be. Perhaps someone else can chime in.

If you are really curious, how about taking some inside and making a little hatchery. Grab some of the surrounding mulch and as many eggs as you can, put them in a transparent container with a screen lid (maybe a large jar with mosquito netting affixed with an elastic). They should hatch out faster in the warmth of inside.

If you do, let us know what they hatch out as.
 
Posts: 247
Location: Virginia,USA zone 6
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snails and slugs place their eggs in mulch, compost and soil. But they're are usually uniform in size.
 
Posts: 36
Location: Central Vermont
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The top one, especially, looks like some kind of fungus. I wouldn't think them to be eggs since there are all different sizes. Eggs would be more similar.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1129
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Due to the size, variations, and cupping, I'd venture to guess that it's a soil fungus. I'll go out on a limb and say the helotiaceae family. But don't take my word on it. I'm no soil expert.
 
Posts: 249
Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
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You might try researching slime mold. Some of them are spherical.
 
pollinator
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I was thinking slime mould too .
Actually first I was thinking why have you dusters on your soil but then I put my glasses on
 
Jd Gonzalez
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http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lycogala_epidendrum

I think this might be it.
 
raven ranson
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The top one, especially, looks like some kind of fungus...



I see it now, especially the top one. If the 'spheres' are indented in one side, it could be one of the jelly mushrooms (like the family you find witches butter in). The more I look at it, the more the top one reminds me of baby witches butter, only I've ever seen it on logs not mulch.

Then again, this slime mold is interesting too. I'm off to learn more about it. Thanks for the link.
 
Courtney Siebken
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Location: Seattle, WA
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Interesting! Yeah it does kind of look like slime/fungus. Thanks everyone.
I think I'll put some in a container and keep an eye on it just to see what happens.
 
Posts: 30
Location: Boulder, CO
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I was just reading in Teaming with Microbes that slime molds called myxamoebae, can be tan, pink, yellow or red and swarm together to feed....says it helps cycle nutrients and bind soil particles...

Maybe this, as indicated in some posts above is what is going on....just throwing out another possibility!
 
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