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Compost tumbler  RSS feed

 
Angelika Maier
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Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I want to try new composting techniques, for making compost fast - I've looked in the internet for compost tumblers. Most of them are drums which are on some sort of a frame and you turn them with a handle.
I once saw a project in a community garden were old water tanks(?) or a similar drum were used and simply put on the ground. doesn't it make more sense laying a drum on the ground (maybe not the size of an old water tank and give it some kicks every day? which size is ideal for a tumbler? And does it makes sense at all since it has no soil contact?
 
Susan Doyon
Posts: 146
Location: Massachusetts
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that should work tumble a few branches in there to help aerate , if the mix does not have enough oxygen it will get slimy and smelly . and Use a few shovels full of old compost if possible soil if you have no compost to help get the right bacteria
started
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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I've used a few that were obtained for free. Even at that price, they are barely worth it. It's very easy to make slime.

When compost is made on the ground, excess moisture can drain and soil organisms can migrate in.
 
Honor Bateman
Posts: 6
Location: East Bay, California USDA zone 9
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I use a compost tumbler because I have a small urban yard and someone gave me the tumbler for free. I would not recommend buying one. I think composting works much better when it directly touches the soil, so organisms can come in and out, water can drain, etc. The "tumbling" supposedly helps you to turn the pile more easily, but it's a joke. When you turn the (full) tumbler, everything inside sticks together in one big lump and just flops over onto the other side. There is very little mixing going on.

In my case, the tumbler is necessary because it can sit on concrete without making a mess, and it completely hides any evidence of composting from my neighbors. Otherwise, keep looking.
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 885
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Thanks, that means I will try the Berkely method on the ground.
 
martin doucet
Posts: 20
Location: New-Brunswick, Canada
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Honor Bateman wrote: The "tumbling" supposedly helps you to turn the pile more easily, but it's a joke. When you turn the (full) tumbler, everything inside sticks together in one big lump and just flops over onto the other side. There is very little mixing going on.


X2. I've tried composting in different containers, but its hard to turn it properly. A loosely covered pile on the ground that can be turned inside out and top to bottom with a pitchfork or similar is the way to go, IMHO.
 
Ci Shepard
Posts: 16
Location: Vancouver Island, BC
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I just bought this Lifetime tumbling composter. I have a lot of free herring available and tried bin composting it only to have rats come and dig it up ... so I'm going to try it in the tumbler. So far I'm happy with the sturdy constructon and filled with 5 gal. of herring and four buckets of brown material it is easy to rotate. Will see how the "sea soil" comes out!

 
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