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Ficus as substrate

 
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I'm fairly new to fungi. How would this work. I have a giant ficus right next to the house that's pushing up the foundation. I want to use it to produce mushrooms. Any thoughts?
 
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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I am only starting out but I have been experimenting growing mushrooms in woody plants that I can't find any information about. so far I have yet to be able to harvest anything but there is for sure mycelium growing that is visible. I think if you have a little money to spend then you could cut off a smaller part and experiment. hopefully someone who knows more about ficus will have better information but if not I think it is worth experimenting.
 
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I think you need to think about what type of climate you live in-where do you live? Different fungi grow well in different places. I would do a search about ficus as a substrate. An aggressive mushroom like oyster or turkey tail would grow well where I live.
John S
PDX OR
 
Sean Rafferty
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Thanks John. I appreciate the response. I live in Southern California. So its a nice climate here for a select species of mushrooms. I can't find much research on google about using ficus as a substrate.
 
John Suavecito
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THe almond agaricus and Pioppino should grow better for you down there than for us up here. They prefer more heat than we provide. I would check those out and some local myco clubs.
John S
PDX OR
 
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