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sub pump for Aerated Compost Tea?

 
                                  
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I have been brewing ACT in a 55 gallon barrel. I'm experimenting using it on lawn to see if it can replace regular fertilizing or at least supliment it. Here's the question. I've been using an aquarium bubbler for aeration but I read somewhere that it's no enough. So this past batch, I decided to use my Sub pump. I attached a small length of hose to it and let the water shoot back into the barrel. I figured that was more than enough air. However, the water heated up significantly because the pump get's hot. I'd say it was 105+.  Will this harm the tea at all??

Thanks
 
Al Loria
Posts: 395
Location: New York
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Buddy,  I'm not an expert but I remember reading that is too high a temp.  I think 95 degrees is about the top end you want.

Yup, just checked.  Not to exceed 95 degrees.  Might want to throw some ice in there.  Just a thought.


Al
 
Jordan Lowery
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i would be more worried from the pump propellers killing or injuring the fungi and bacteria than heat.
 
Jeremy Bunag
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Location: Central IL
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Yeah, I have heard aquarium bubblers are good for 5 gallon buckets.  I guess you'd need 11 aquarium bubblers then!

This  pump claims it can supply air to 9 aquarium air features.  Not terribly expensive either.  Perhaps that would be enough?

Does your bubble rock go all the way to the bottom of the barrel? 
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Location: Oakland, CA
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Another option would be to set up a flowform or some other sort of fountain feature, rather than pumping water directly back in.

That way, the cooling would go right along with the aeration.

A working flowform can be a lot of work, and sometimes a lot of expense, but they're really fun to watch in action, almost as good as a campfire.
 
Emerson White
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Location: Alaska
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Get a bigger air pump, they come in all sorts of sizes (the biggest one I ever worked with was sufficient to aerate 3K gallons, man was it a beast), then make yourself a basswood airblock. Cut a piece of basswood into roughly square cross sections across the grain, then soak it overnight in water, glue it into a cube with superglue and drill a hole in one end and glue in an airline fitting. You have to keep it wet until you are done with it because drying out will crack it, and you may have to trim a piece or two to get it to fit together well if you don't have steady hands (with which to glue pieces that barely overhang) but it will produce a huge volume of tiny bubbles for you, much better than those cheap air rocks.
 
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