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cow farts  RSS feed

 
Posts: 318
Location: Pittsburgh PA
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Regardless of the fact cows mostly burp gas, and this is just to make large scale cow factories look better, it got a little giggle out of me. I also feel that it could spark up a conversation that i am sure will go in all sorts of directions.



http://m.fastcompany.com/3028933/these-backpacks-for-cows-collect-their-fart-gas-and-store-it-for-energy

 
pollinator
Posts: 683
Location: Federal Way, WA - Western Washington (Zone 8 - temperate maritime)
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It's not a 'capture' system, but for those who aren't aware yet, here's info on how to achieve a 20% reduction ...

http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/raising-cattle/pasture-grass-methane-from-cows-zmaz10djzraw.aspx

And a commenter explains why cow fart GHG are different from fossile fuel GHG...

"The methane expelled by animals is the product of oxidation of carbon based food stuffs. The carbon in that food was obtained by extracting it from the atmosphere and the flatus merely returns it to the atmosphere. It's a complete cycle: NO NET CHANGE in GHGs."
 
chad Christopher
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Nancy, great article. I love that it takes a group of 'scientists' to come to the conclusion, that cows need good pasture. But kudos to the people at dannon, for making an attempt.

The carbon exchange makes perfect sense, and in the same lines of responsible wood burning, and bio char.
 
nancy sutton
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Precisely, Chad!! That's a big selling point with biochar... and I'll mention again, for us suburbanite, mini-plot, cash-strapped folks, that Trader Joe's "100 % natural BBQ Briquettes" (THESE ARE NOT KINGSFORD, and the other chemical bomb briquettes that we are rightly warned away from) are all natural, from coppiced hardwoods in South America, with only cornstarch added as binder. (I gave the whole history of this product in a 'biochar' thread ;)


Yes, I know it's not exactly the same, but... its affordable and works ... long term water and nutrient and carbon capture ;) I don't know if we can trust the commercial biochar profiteers, but WE can make and use it to serve multiple functions.

Sorry, OT.... again... :(

UPDATE! -- after spending hours last summer crushing these charcoal briquettes with sledge hammer and concrete paver... I just discovered that they FALL APART sitting in 'liquid' for as little as two days! I guess the cornstarch binder dissolves readily. Wish I'd thought to test this last year ;)
 
Let me tell you a story about a man named Jed. He made this tiny ad:
What would you cook first in a rocket oven?
https://permies.com/t/89866/cook-rocket-oven
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