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I'm allergic to EVERYTHING.  RSS feed

 
Michelle Lasher
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I need serious help figuring out what to eat for breakfast!! I'm allergic to:
Grains
Dairy
Corn
Tomato
Eggs
Peanuts
Chocolate
Avocado
Apple
Banana
And I'm very sensitive to sugar, including fruit sugar

What the heck do I eat for breakfast??


 
Dawn Hoff
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Hugs - that is really though!

Try to remember that breakfast is just food - any thing you eat ay other times during the day can be raten for breakfast. When my son and I were going through a Total Elimination Diet to figure out what he was allergic to - er ate chicken, brown rice and chicken broth three times a day for three weeks, and then added one new thing every three days. Once you have done that you realise that it doesn't really matter if food is traditionnaly seen as breakfast - it is just food. My son still can eat eggs, so sometimes he has bacon and steamed broccoli for breakfast, or sausages or grilled chicken.
 
Michelle Lasher
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Oh by the way, I'm a breastfeeding mom! So I've also got to make sure I'm getting enough calories and good fat.
 
Michelle Lasher
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Thank you Dawn. I was actually thinking of maybe doing some kind of broccoli stir fry in animal fat from the night before. Definitely not the typical idea of a breakfast food but I'll try to get over that!
 
r ranson
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Hugs to you. What to eat when you can't eat anything is a tough decision.

I think Dawn has the right idea. Restricting yourself to our cultural ideas of what a meal should contain can be really hard when you have limited dietary choices.

Personally, I think breakfast is evil and I refuse to have anything to do with it. All the foods people consider 'breakfast' in this part of the world are either disgusting or I'm allergic to it. But if I have to eat a meal before 11am, I usually make a small dinner. Something with a lot of protein and carbs to get me going. Maybe bacon with boiled new potatoes fried in the bacon fat.

Quite a few places in the world eat fish for their first meal of the day, it's actually quite good. A bit of salmon, some veggies, a starch.

I didn't see legumes on your list. How about chickpea hummus with vegetables and maybe a few small bites of fruit. Fruit and sugar in general are easier to digest when accompanied by large amounts of protein - at least that's what the doctors say to diabetics in our family.

Mild Indian curry made from scratch.

Anything catch your fancy? I can dig up some cookbook suggestions if you like, which your local library should have.

For clarity, is it all grains, or gluten? Is rice out? How about other grain like objects like buckwheat (which is neither wheat nor grain), quinoa, sorghum, millet, and amaranth? Also, the items on your list, are you also avoiding traces of them, or the more general elimination. There are so many different dietary needs that people have, that it's good to check these things.

For example, if you can have buckwheat, then I would recommend something made with Soba noodles. Then again, most traditional soba recipes call for soy sauce, which is traditionally made with wheat, rice, or barley - all grains. Some soy sauce can be made with only soy, but it tends to be hard to find and sometimes contains MSG - which can be made from soy, corn, and several other things. That's okay, because there are lots of things we can use as soy sauce substitute including fish sauce - which is just fish fermented in salt. Using this, we can make a mild version of Cold Soba noodles for breakfast, which is very soothing on the tummy. Of course, that assumes you can eat buckwheat.

If you can eat buckwheat, it opens up a whole range of traditional, healthy, tasty foods for you. But if not, then we can try something else.

Sending good thoughts your way. Hang in there.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Allergies seem to me to be more about whole systems than about any particular food.

If it were me...

I'd change my routine/schedule to eat meals outdoors, and I'd wear as skimpy of clothing as possible to avoid being arrested, so that I could get plenty of sunlight to generate lots of vitamin D.

I'd be very serious about not eating any grain for any reason. Grains strike me as not fit for human consumption in the first place, and especially not in recent decades when they come doused in -cides. I know that in society grains are in every processed food, and often times are present in all courses of a meal, but if grains cause problems then don't eat them. And I would avoid dairy, both because it is a common allergen to adult humans and because it can be expected to be a concentrated source of the -cides from the grains and soybeans that the cows are fed. Grains, dairy, and vitamin A deficiency seem to be strongly implicated in "leaky gut syndrome" and thus allergic reactions. Vitamin A intake can be increased by eating more dark green or orange vegetables or liver.

I would eat lots of different kinds of fermented foods. Some of the -cides that are heavily used in agriculture today have anti-biotic properties and their residues in food can be expected to diminish gut flora. Fermented foods would help keep a higher population of helpful microbes in the gut.

I'd change my cooking oil to coconut oil. I'd avoid processed foods because of the high Omega-6 oils that they typically contain. In my own life I found it easier to reduce consumption of Omega-6 oils than to increase consumption of Omega-3s. I'd eat more fish.

I'd cook more of my own meals, using more ingredients that I can identify as being a particular part of a particular species. In other words, whole foods, not ground up mashes that could contain anything.

I'd change my choice in meats to be only animals that were not fed grains...

I'd make sure that my weight was at a healthy level.

If tomatoes didn't work for me I'd also avoid other nightshades like peppers, potatoes, and eggplant.

I'd fast from time to time for 18 to 36 hours while drinking sufficient water.

I'd eat more ginger, mint, and hot peppers for their decongesting properties.

I'd use a neti-pot and change the shower head to one that creates a fine mist with lots of aerosolized water particles in it.

If I got really desperate, I might take up running.









 
Rhys Firth
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Hash browns with sausage and bacon and a baked beans.

Barring the missing fried tomatos, a real English farmhouse breakfast.
 
Dawn Hoff
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Baked beans contain tomato though.

But hash browns, a good sausage and seamed veggies, fat.

Make sure you eat liver (eg as a pate), while breastfeeding, and bone broth, steamed veggies and/or fermented (esp. Legumes since you already have peanut allergies).

Have you looked into the GAPs diet? If my allergies were that bad I would try it out.

You might be able to eat duck eggs.
 
Michelle Lasher
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Thank you all for your help! I have leaky gut so I'm hoping all of these allergies are short term. It's so hard and its looking like I'll be eating basically the same things over and over. I'm going to try sweet potatoes and a handful of cashews for breakfast and see how I feel. I tried hummus and black beans this weekend and my body is upset with me today so I think I'll have to avoid those too, which really sucks because it's a cheap source of protein. One weird discovery though is that when I eat something I'm sensitive to it makes me feel MORE hungry, so I think I was eating more than I actually needed before. Without feeling like I constantly need a snack, less variety doesn't sound so bad.
 
Lorenzo Costa
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Hi, big problem but the solution is in front of you just think of it in a different way, think of how many different ingredients you could use that you haven't until now. I had my partner gluten intolerant and had to rethink my cooking way.

you could eat potatoes, I grate them very fine and they do this sort of water, I put curry, salt, pepper, what I have and form some patties that stay in my hand, flat, and just throw them in the oiled pan. the starch keeps it all together. they are delicious. you dont' use eggs.
otherwise cickpeas, with the flour from chickpeas we do a sort of pizza in Tuscany, called cecina, you can cook it on a pan with the cover on top or in the oven qould be better.
you take the flour, water, some oil and mix it al together when it's smooth, you let it rest, sort of ike what one does with pizza dough, you can put some baking soda to make it rise a bit not to much though.
or other wise hommus with chickpeas, delicious.
 
mark andrews
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I would try bullet-proof coffee.
By the way, looking at your list, it appears you are very sensitive to lectins--so I wouldn't try any more legumes, american dairy, nightshades or grains of any kind any time soon.

You need to find a medical professional that understands these things...which is REALLY rare.
PM me if you need help with that.

 
R Scott
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If you fix your gut biome balance I am 99% sure the allergies and leaky gut will go away. Easier said than done, but we have been successful doing that in our family.


 
John Master
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Look at the wapf dietary guidelines, perhaps focus on the things you can eat right now on their list and as your health improves try to incorporate more of the things you may not be able to. Coconut products like coconut oil, shredded coconut and coconut cream are some of the most nutritious foods. Cod liver oil and high vitamin butter oil taken together are incredibly health promoting. Most people who think they are allergic to eggs are reacting to the soy fed commercial eggs. Think about trying to find organic pastured (no soy) eggs and see if they agree with you. All components to create a new life are contained in an egg, they are a very body building food.
 
Dawn Hoff
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My son is type 1 (anaphylactic, astma, hives etc) to dairy, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts and raw meat. When he was a baby and the Dr refused to test him (because babies can't have allergies...?) I tried a Total Elimination Diet: We cut out all foods except chicken, rice and sweet potato and then when he was comepletely symptoms free, we reintroduced on item at a time with a three day spacing. It is a lot like the GAPs diet - except in the GAPs diet you start out with only chicken and chicken broth and you reintroduce specific items - like brine from sauerkraut, sauerkraut, egg yolks etc one at a time. It heals the gut and means that in time (over the course of a few years), you might be able to tolerate most if not all of the items that you are allergic to now. Had I the option I would do that to my son now - but he is not willing, which makes it hard when he is 9 and not 1 what I do how-ever is try to give him as many "GAPs friendly" foods in our day to day lives -
Which means that he is now showing signs of growing out of his allergies (he hasn't had an astma attac in more than a year).
 
John Master
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Oh yes, broth, broth is amazing!
 
r ranson
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It could be the sudden intake of fibre that the hummus provided that triggered symptoms. High fibre foods can cause bad reactions when your gut is sensitive. Perhaps sticking to easier to digest legumes like chickpeas, fava beans (provided you don't have favism), lentils and cowpeas (blackeye peas) would be helpful while your gut heals. And even then, use these beans as a side dish rather than a main.

Eliminating so much from your diet at one time can be extremely stressful, and stress can cause gut symptoms, just as strong or stronger than eating 'wrong' foods. If a food gives you a reaction for the first time, don't necessary knock it off your list. It may be something else that caused the reaction, or it could be you've exceeded your bodies quantity for that food this week. Maybe leave the offending food off for a week or two, then try it again in small doses.



My thoughts and observations about gut illnesses like IBS, leaky gut, &c. is that it often is useful to go back to your ancestral diet, once you've finished the cleansing part and can start adding foods back to your diet instead of constantly taking away food choices. I've seen this work with many different people, but I'll use my own experience as an example.

I have an illness that gave me a late onset list of allergies (ige immune response) and sensitivities (igg and iga immune response) that would make your mind boggle. For most of a year, I lived on an elimination diet of rice, carrots, and chicken - so long as the chicken hadn't eaten any of my main trigger foods like soy. It was a bad time. But eventually, the gut began to heal itself from the damage. I don't know if GAPs diet was around then, but if it was, I didn't know about it. Instead, I relied quite heavily on the works of people like sally fallon, who write about what diet was like before industrialized agriculture and food processing methods. I already had quite a collection of books and research from my interest in the history of kitchen and household management, so I used these as resources for building my new diet.

In my reading, I began to think that maybe people are like plants. If I save seeds from plants that grow in my garden, then after a few generations, the plants I grow from my saved seed are genetically selected for my growing conditions. Humans, I figure, are similar to plants, in that our genetics adapt to thrive in different environments and specifically different diets. Seeds from my garden, did very poorly in my grandfather's garden, as he uses chemical fertilizers and excessive amounts of water in his garden, whereas I use very little water and rely heavily on manure and compost to feed my plants. Seeds he saves, do not grow in my garden because his seeds are acclimatized to growing on different food. Before humans had so much choice in foods, and before we had a medical system that can stay the hand of natural selection, I think that diet may have been the most influential criteria for survival. In Norther Europe, grains were the main source of nourishment, so if people with genetics that could not utilize grains, would not survive to reproduce. In Asia, an allergy to soy would prove fatal at an early age. In parts of The Americas, corn would be the deciding food. Throughout most of history, people had no choice what they ate, just as my plants don't have the choice of what nourishment I give them. Those that thrive, reproduce, and their offspring usually thrive too.

What am I getting at? With my own experience, once the initial gut symptoms calmed, I found that the foods I could add back into my diet were all Old World foods. New World foods like tomatoes, potatoes, New World beans, corn, &c, all cause symptoms when I eat them more than once per week. My ancestors are Russian Mennonite and English. Foods from these cultures, pre circa 1850, are exactly the foods that agree with my gut. My friend from Japan, had a similar gut problem when she moved to North America, but returning to her traditional Japanese diet - one without processed foods - caused these problems to vanish. Whereas eating Western foods like milk and wheat, makes her symptoms return.

I have a long list of anecdotal examples of people who have returned to their ancestral diets, after the period of cleansing their gut, to find that the foods their ancestors eat are exactly the foods that don't hurt their gut. But I'm no doctor, these are just my thoughts and observations. I cannot say that others should adopt this kind of diet. Although, I have noticed that specific diets applied universally do not work for everyone - the GAPs diet would not have worked for my situation. I feel that the diet one does best on, needs to be customized to that individual.

Perhaps, however, it's worth thinking about when your gut begins to heal and you can add foods back into your regime - perhaps it's worth starting with foods that your particular ancestors ate.



Another thought.

I don't know how it is where you live, but here, if the doctor sees you are having trouble with your diet, due to sensitivities or allergies, and are having to avoid many different foods, they will often prescribe a visit to the nutritionist. Nutritionists are usually part of the hospital system, and are usually well trained to follow the current government dietary standards. I suspect they would be subsidized or free in places where one pays for medical service, as they serve a major part in educating the public to the government's view of diet. Even with their bias, these people can be amazingly helpful in discovering mild, nutritionally dense foods that you can eat. They can suggest how to combine the different foods that don't give you symptoms to give you a more complete nutritional absorption - for example, eating beans with rice, even just a few beans like from a bowl of miso soup (miso can be made from any kind of bean), almost doubles the amount of protein you body can absorb and use, than with rice alone. If you have access to a nutritionist, it's well worth taking advantage of any knowledge they can share - but remember you are the one putting food in your mouth, their service is just a tool to help you discover different ways of doing it. But you must make the final choice.



 
Nick Kitchener
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It turns out that if you look at all the living cells that make up "you", you will find that only about 10% are actually human.
Only recently has research turned its attention to the other 90% and how they contribute to making us "us".

An example of this is how the micro-organisms in our gut control our immune response, and there are now studies that have been done, and regimens developed, for treating chronic conditions like serious food allergies through the management of these populations.

If you haven't already studied this then I advice you take a good look.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I've had to reduce a lot of the same things in my diet, due to nursing a food-sensitive baby. I went on a total elimation diet for a while with just rice, pears, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin. I've been able to introduce a lot more foods since then. Breakfast is definitely the hardest meal for me, as I want something I don't have to prepare in the morning, and that easy for me to digest (I can't seem to eat meat in the morning...).

Right now, I've been enjoying coconut pudding (8 oz of full-fat coconut milk, 1 tbsp of grass-fed gelatin, 1/4 tsp vanilla, and 2 tbsp of honey). That gets me some protine, lots of fat calories, and a little carbs. It's been working well for me. You could probably change it up with other flavor extracts.

You could also make pumpkin pudding. I don't recall what recipe I used when I made mine, but here's one that looks good: http://againstallgrain.com/2014/11/20/pumpkin-pudding-egg-free-dairy-free/

You should be able to reduce the sugar in both of the recipes, or switch it to maple syrup if that works better for you.
 
Nicole Alderman
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Dawn Hoff wrote:

Make sure you eat liver (eg as a pate), while breastfeeding, and bone broth, steamed veggies and/or fermented (esp. Legumes since you already have peanut allergies).


Just thought I'd mention that if you don't like beef liver, chicken liver, duck liver and lamb liver all taste a WHOLE lot better. They don't have the aftertaste that beef liver has. I actually really enjoy eating them, but hate beef liver.
 
Michelle Lasher
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Thank you everyone. Still haven't been able to figure out a good breakfast that doesn't upset my body in some way. Sweet potatoes make me tired, fruit makes me bloated, nuts hurt my stomach. I think I'll try out some coconut products and see if I like any, and I'll test some soy free eggs, crossing my fingers it's from the soy. To top this whole thing off I just discovered that I'm slightly underweight, with a BMI of 18. All of this while breastfeeding and now trying to gain weight is quite the challenge. I do think lectins are a problem so I think I'll quit the nuts for a while. I also did an at home Candida spit test which showed that I do have it. UnfortunatelThank you everyone. Still haven't been able to figure out a good breakfast that doesn't upset my body in some way. Sweet potatoes make me tired, fruit makes me bloated, nuts hurt my stomach. I think I'll try out some coconut products and see if I like any. To top this whole thing off I just discovered that I'm technically underweight. I have a BMI of 18. All this while breastfeeding and now trying to gain weight is quite the challenge. Unfortunately, I can't do the cleanse while breastfeeding so I've got about a year longer to try to just keep symptoms under control.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I feel your pain. I thankfully wasn't underweight when I went on my elimination diet, but I definitely lost all my pregnancy pounds right away, and am back to "average" weight. People would say, "Wow, you lost your baby weight so fast!" To which I'd think, "You try being on an elimination diet and needing to cook everything from scratch, all the while continually pacing the house just to keep a colicily baby from screaming like he was dying." Thankfully we're now pretty much past those days (he's almost two and handling more foods), but I clearly remember the frustration, stress, hunger, and despair.

For gaining weight, I'd say try to have a helper (husband, mother, friend) come by so you (or they) can batch cook a bunch of easy foods you can eat with one hand. Make stirfrys high on the meat and fats (cook it in lots of coconut oil or palm oil or whatever oil you can stomach). Ginger and garlic are gentle on the stomach and make good seasoning on a stirfry (not eating soy, I would use salt, pepper and lots of garlic and ginger to season my stirfries). And, because the meat is already cut, you don't need two hands to eat it. You can switch up the meat and vegetables to different ones to keep things interesting and keep you eating.

Eat all the meat! Chicken drumsticks, chicken thighs, steak, lamb, turkey, fish. If you can get pastured/organic, eat the fattiest cuts. Try to eat a different meat each day, or at least one seasoned/prepared differently so that the variety keeps you eating more. Eat while the baby nurses!

You can also try blending or juicing your veggies to make it quicker/easier to eat those calories one-handed. Mix in almond or cashew butter if those don't mess with your stomach like peanuts (edit: I just read that they hurt your stomach. Is that just eating nuts whole, or also the butters? It might be that the nuts are scraping on your intestine wall, and the butters might be fine for you...).

Since you can't eat much sugar, or any grains, you have to make sure you're getting carbs &/or fat along with your protein, as you don't want "rabbit starvation." Cook with lots of fat (you might need to introduce the fat slowly, as it can give you diarrhea/really loose stools if you eat too much before your body learns to digest it...don't ask me how I know). The fat should also help you eat more, as it will make things taste better. Also, like other's have said, drink more broth! If you have a pressure cooker, you can throw the bones from your meat in there and have broth in an hour. Here's the one we use and love: http://www.amazon.com/Instant-Pot-IP-DUO60-Programmable-Generation/dp/B00FLYWNYQ. Pressure cookers also are marvelous for quickly cooking meat, vegetables, etc. I am very thankful for mine, and how much easier it is to throw some food together at the last minute and have something to eat quickly.

You can also make a lot of different types of "chips" by baking (at around 350 degrees F) various vegetables, like beets, carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, etc. Palm oil and lard/tallow/duck fat work well for this. They sadly do take about 45 minutes-1 hour to cook, and take a while to prepare (and time is not likely something you have much of!). Sweet potatoes, if you can stomach them, are chock full of vitamins and give you some much needed carbs. The white ones are not nearly as sweet as the orange ones, and taste more like potatoes. (Edit: I see you find that they make you sleepy. Maybe you have a hard time tolerating carbs as a whole? Have you tried preparing them with more fat? The fat, from what I've been reading slows down the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream and prevents sugar highs and sugar crashes [http://empoweredsustenance.com/balance-blood-sugar-naturally/])

You can also make cauliflower or broccoli mashed "potatoes." Or make giant vats of pumpkin or broccoli or beet or squash soups to reheat as needed. They're like warm smoothies, and you can drink those calories one-handed!

I hope that give you some helpful ideas. I remember how lost I was trying to figure out what I could eat, especially when my time was eaten by baby and my brain destroyed by sleep-deprivation!
 
jacque greenleaf
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Michelle Lasher wrote:Thank you everyone. Still haven't been able to figure out a good breakfast that doesn't upset my body in some way. Sweet potatoes make me tired, fruit makes me bloated, nuts hurt my stomach. I think I'll try out some coconut products and see if I like any, and I'll test some soy free eggs, crossing my fingers it's from the soy. To top this whole thing off I just discovered that I'm slightly underweight, with a BMI of 18. All of this while breastfeeding and now trying to gain weight is quite the challenge. I do think lectins are a problem so I think I'll quit the nuts for a while. I also did an at home Candida spit test which showed that I do have it. UnfortunatelThank you everyone. Still haven't been able to figure out a good breakfast that doesn't upset my body in some way. Sweet potatoes make me tired, fruit makes me bloated, nuts hurt my stomach. I think I'll try out some coconut products and see if I like any. To top this whole thing off I just discovered that I'm technically underweight. I have a BMI of 18. All this while breastfeeding and now trying to gain weight is quite the challenge. Unfortunately, I can't do the cleanse while breastfeeding so I've got about a year longer to try to just keep symptoms under control.


I feel for you, I became unable to tolerate many foods a couple years ago, and it is a real struggle. I thought at first that I was sensitive to gluten - and I do react very badly to it - but it became evident that dairy and nuts are also no-nos for me. I seem to have IBS, but don't have a real diagnosis because if I went to a doctor, the first thing they'd want is to test for celiac, and I'd have to start eating gluten again for the test to pick up celiac. NO WAY am I doing that, the resulting upheaval would not be pretty. Still, there are times when I'd kill for a grilled cheese sandwich.

My favorite breakfast is two eggs (the best quality I can find, with those orange yolks), either scrambled or in an omelet with veggies (usually at least kale) and a huge salad which includes cabbage and radicchio (for the anthocyanins). If I were worried about carotene, I'd add carrots. Make your own dressing - no sweetener. Another breakfast I like is soup over a couple of poached eggs. Any soup you can eat works with this.

You might want to take a look at the Low FODMAP diet. It has worked pretty well for me, and it is less severe than the GAPS diet. Just google. And I find that a lot of Thai recipes work well for me - very flavorful, don't depend on dairy or wheat. Coconut milk and coconut oil are very healthy fats.

If I stick to the diet, about 70% of the time my gut is fine. But there are still times when it is NOT fine, and I have no idea why. Still, I have a lot less abdominal pain, I sleep better, and I don't have to stick close to a bathroom all the time.

Have you seen a dietitian? Look around for one in your area that specializes in gut/inflammation issues. They are out there.

 
Angelika Maier
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Have you ever tried a traditional Chinese doctor? They see things a bit more holistic and you might get rid of your symptoms. It's a pain being allergic to food.
 
Joy Oasis
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Nicole Alderman wrote:

Right now, I've been enjoying coconut pudding (8 oz of full-fat coconut milk, 1 tbsp of grass-fed gelatin, 1/4 tsp vanilla, and 2 tbsp of honey). That gets me some protine, lots of fat calories, and a little carbs. It's been working well for me. 


How do you make it? Melt gelatin in the heated coconut milk?
 
Kim Goodwin
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I was very similar for about 6 years.  At my worst, all I could eat was beef broth and cooked cabbage.  Miserable.

I healed using the GAPS diet and healing my gut and liver. From meeting many others with this issue, I found that most of these sorts of sensitivities come from gut and liver being compromised.  Sometimes by parasites, and/or candida, but often also from a toxic exposure in the environment.  I had all of the above.  There is a lot of info on it online, and there are often local GAPS support groups.  GAPS alone won't do it - most people will still need the liver help and to eliminate pathogens.

I also had to get out of a moldy home and environment.  Once I did that, I had very dramatic changes.  Now I can eat almost anything.

Try looking up GAPs.  GAPS starts out eliminating starches - and that really is a key to the healing process for many.  There is much literature on this.

If you can't do that for some reason, you might try incorporating more Asian starches into your diet.  Before GAPS, I ate buckwheat, or cassava patties (fried like a hashbrown), taro, and bean thread noodles.

Wishing you well...

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