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Just weeds and vegetables.

 
Matthew McCoul
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Location: Southeast Michigan
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I've recently got a scythe, learned how to use it effectively, and I have access to more tall weeds (2ft+) than I will ever use.

I also have kitchen scraps and the occasional load of ground up vegetable leftovers from our local Whole Foods juice bar.

Is this enough for a good compost pile?
Could it work if it were JUST the fresh weeds?
 
Mike Feddersen
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Don't know where you are Located, but I love how this Chicago area backyard gardener has taken free ingredients to naturally fortify his garden. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ExuE9rgcbZ8

Fall leaves, mulch from a community pile, coffee grounds and green waste. There are lots of good videos by him.
 
David Creed
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You need to have brown material in the mix, for me its leaves in the autumn/fall and corrugated cardboard in the summer time, I wet the cardboard and then put it through my shredder, cheers Dave NE
 
Mike Feddersen
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Hey Dave I was wondering if for the "brown material" you could cut weeds and dry them out? Essentially same as the green material but delayed putting in compost under green stuff.
 
Alex Veidel
Posts: 123
Location: Elgin, IL
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Drying out weeds for your carbon material would work quite well. Actually, I've found that a lot of weeds seem to be a little low on the nitrogen side of the C:N ratio, so you may find yourself needing more greens than you might need using other materials.
 
Mike Feddersen
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Alex thanks for your post. It made me curious so I googled weeds high in nitrogen .
A number of great articles came up and one from geoff lawton follower speaking of three specific: 2 were water lovers and one was stinging nettles. I would recommend anyone curious to free fertilizers do that search, I did it without parenthesis.
Made me wonder about lake areas/ponds that have to do clearing of things like water hyacinth? (spelling) I wonder about its' fertilizer potential in nonwater setting.
 
David Creed
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Hi Mike, I am sure I read somewhere that dried cut weeds are still classed as greens because, as they were green when cut, the minerals etc are still present, once you add water they are much the same as before. I don't have access to straw bales etc so rely on a local resource which in my case is cardboard, the super markets have tons of the stuff. I only have a small back garden but I place the CB under trees and bushes where the wind and rain + bird poo start to break it down before the shredder does its job. I have 9 small scale experiments going at this time, sawdust and urine, leaves and coffee grounds, comfrey/kitchen scraps/CB etc etc and these are what are local to my area, have a look at your place and surrounding areas, breweries coffee shops super markets, cheers Dave NE UK
 
Mike Feddersen
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This is off topic Dave (and I will sound like an idiot ), but when I read your last post I detected no UK accent at all.
 
Nick Kitchener
Posts: 465
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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A number of years ago my local church put in a car park and had a large pile of left over gravel. Over the next decade or two, it became heavily populated with goldenrod. Each year, it dies back and comes back in the spring.

I'm looking at this area to put in a large garden so I went up to have a poke around and see what was going on. I dug down into what I discovered to be rich topsoil and couldn't find any gravel. There must be a few feet of awesome soil there and that is simply a product of the goldenrod activity.

I'm sure you can make fantastic compost with nothing but weeds and garden scraps. It might take a bit longer than other compost recipes, but it will be as good as any compost you could buy, and with a healthy soil biology in place, it will probably be better.
 
Alex Veidel
Posts: 123
Location: Elgin, IL
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Nick Kitchener wrote:... but it will be as good as any compost you could buy, and with a healthy soil biology in place, it will probably be better.


Ha, that's an understatement! Store bought compost is microbial garbage
 
Hester Winterbourne
Posts: 119
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b)
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You can do it by trial and error. Make your compost pile, if it seems dry and inactive you need higher nitrogen stuff. If it goes slimy and disappears too quickly you need more "browns". Different weeds, different ages of weeds, chopping or not chopping...
 
Kj Koch
Posts: 21
Location: Jersey Shore PA
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I keep a pile of cut weeds going all year with a little grass, some coffee grounds and my Mothers kitchen scraps. (mine goes to the worms) It does realy good as long as I keep it damp. Im gonna give that cardboard idea a try!
 
I'm a lumberjack and I'm okay, I sleep all night and work all day. Lumberjack ad:
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