• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Raspberry leaf edges are turning brown?  RSS feed

 
Nic Foro
Posts: 32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5k8gqb90c7y22gh/AADSOdrlCI2RaiqhuGJHixX3a?dl=0
South Texas

If the images aren't clear enough, you can zoom in by clicking them.

The high resolution images are in my dropbox folder above. In the last few days I've noticed the edges on my raspberry plants are turning brown and it doesn't seem to be improving. I originally suspected I over watered them (.5GPH drip emitters) Or that the leaves were damaged by a more concentrated spray of pyrethrin from a bad company that didn't make it clear that there were also petroleum products mixed in. Natural Pyrethrins only last a day and break down in sunlight.

More recently, I haven't pruned my tomatoes of excess leaves in 2-3 weeks and I've noticed some of the lowest ones dead and brown at the bottom. I know tomatoes are pest and disease magnets, along with being nitrogen pigs and its the last year I put up with such needy plants that need to be constantly staked up, tied, and trimmed for fruit that usually ends up being unsellable from damage or rots on the store shelves before it can be sold.

My main concern now is the tomatoes have infected the soil with Verticillium Wilt. Its not common but occasionally I'll have an eggplant or a pepper be completely healthy one day only to be wilted and die the next with the neighboring plants completely unaffected. Though I also suspect the previous land owners burned their trash in these "trouble spots" because I have found remnants of burnt wood and plastics. This being over the course of a few years. Tomatoes, squash, potatoes, and raspberries all tend to share the same pests but its never really been an issue with adequate trimming, weeding, not watering the leaves, etc. I had plans to put three, hundred foot rows of raspberries in after august when the tomatoes die and the weather cools but now its not looking good. It was supposed to be the start of a more permanent business so I could support myself and not be limited to growing cucumbers and other temporary non-sense.

Right now the plants are still alive, not-wilted, and green, save for the brown edges, the pictures were taken a few hours prior to this posting, but the stems have a fine blue tint on them which is associated with fungus and diseases. The tint may be part of the new growth, or it may be Verticillium Wilt but its not apparent enough to decide on. The color can be rubbed off though, so I suspect its fungus, all plants have new growth on them that seems unaffected.

The current raspberries planted are heritage and one lantham, the plants under the trees are separated from the garden by about 30ft. I need someone more experienced to assist me since this is only my second season at farming and I have little idea as to what it really it and only have my guesses to go on.
 
Blake Wheeler
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Interesting. I can't say I have an answer for you Nick, but I will keep an eye on this thread. Just started growing Heritage raspberries myself, and I too am using .5 gallon drip line. No problems yet, apart from the leaves don't quite have enough green for my taste, probably gonna hit me with some blood meal tomorrow.

If you're suspecting a fungal issue spray them a copper fungicide. We've had a wet spring, and combined with the the damn-near 150% humidity I've had my share of fungal issues with my new trees. The fungicide I used, made by Bonide I believe, helped immensely for my plums, though I think it's time for a respray. Going to try a neem oil this time to handle it and aphids in one go around.
 
Nic Foro
Posts: 32
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I went ahead and snipped a lot of the affected leaves off while dipping the scissors in a mild bleach and soap solution. Spilled a little but I threw that patch of dirt out of the garden. My heritage raspberry leaves turned yellow on their older canes shortly after fruiting was finished, I just snipped them off because I'm more interested in getting them all established this year and didn't want yellowed out leaves and old materials getting the new canes sick.

Bonide products are banned from my garden because they contain petroleum products, failed to function as intended, among other things. Cinnamon is an anti-fungal and a rooting agent so I may brew some if this problem persists but I would thing the plants would show signs of significant wilting or stress by now. I may be over reacting and its just mild fertilizer burn (3-4-3) or something, its called replenish and all organic. It may also just be damage or stress from putting them on the new cattle panels. All I can really do it monitor it and act as the situation changes.
 
Blake Wheeler
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nick Ford wrote:
Bonide products are banned from my garden because they contain petroleum products, failed to function as intended, among other things.


Really? This stuff was labeled as safe for organic gardening. Guess that just proves the old adage about truth in advertising.

Now on the cinnamon does it have to be true Ceylon cinnamon, or the knock-off Chinese version most places carry? Being somewhat related I can imagine both may work, but I'm interested in knowing for sure
 
Nic Foro
Posts: 32
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm under the impression I can use the value pack cinnamon from the store. Steep it over night, strain and spray. As for Bonide, it was specifically their pyrethin, fine little red text on the label hidden away at the bottom, your mileage may vary with soaps and other products.
 
Blake Wheeler
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nick Ford wrote:I'm under the impression I can use the value pack cinnamon from the store. Steep it over night, strain and spray. As for Bonide, it was specifically their pyrethin, fine little red text on the label hidden away at the bottom, your mileage may vary with soaps and other products.


Ah! That's good to know. Gonna have to keep my eyes out for it next time. Keep us updated on the cinnamon, may be something I have to try depending on your results
 
Nic Foro
Posts: 32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The browning has ceased on my raspberries and they are moving back to being completely green again, I didn't need to apply anything so it was likely stress. More than likely this was burn from soap or stress from ripping them around when installing the cattle panels, but it doesn't hurt much to be paranoid. I'm going to put some of the raspberries into big permanent pots in the spring because the majority are being planted directly after tomatoes which is a big no-no. Even though we are isolated and grow everything from seed, bags of clippings I get from recycling may contain unknown stuff and the tomatoes may have left something in the soil that I don't know about. I don't want all my eggs in one basket.

This tropical storm has me wondering now if I should eat the cost of putting in post and cattle panel every eight feet, or go with putting posts every 20 and 40 feet and run cable or 550/750 cord for support of the canes. Almost everything in my garden got beat down by the wind but my rasps were fine.

Anyhoo, I guess that marks the end of the thread...
 
Blake Wheeler
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Awesome. So gotta ask, why cattle panels versus a more traditional wire trellis system? Don't get me wrong, cattle panels are amazing, especially for the price, but I'd almost think a regular 2 bottom wire, 2 top wire trellis system would be easier to work around
 
Nic Foro
Posts: 32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I used the wire panels at first because I had never got around to looking up the cable system. I'm thinking about using them now due to the tropical storm and we are going into El Nino (wet summers), the wind ripped up just about everything except my raspberries which were secured to the panels and couldn't move much. A cable system would give me a wider growing row so I'll have to sit out there and think on it for a while.
 
Nothing? Or something? Like this tiny ad:
paul's patreon stuff
https://permies.com/t/60329/paul-patreon-stuff
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!