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Home garden in Japan

 
gardener
Posts: 1665
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
747
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I think I have moles. They're not causing any major problems yet, unless they're nibbling at my root vegetables where I can't see them. There are semi feral cats around though, so I doubt the moles will last too long.
IMG_20211111_123304540_HDR.jpg
A series of holes in my raised beds
A series of holes in my raised beds
 
L. Johnson
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Posts: 1665
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
747
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Broadcast poly culture experiment

Both seem to be working. I think the mulched bed is growing a little faster more because it gets more sunlight than any other factor.

It may also just be related to seed dispersal discrepancy but the lettuces seem to like the grass mulched bed more than the brassicas.
IMG_20211127_084702469_HDR.jpg
Grass mulch
Grass mulch
IMG_20211127_084718911_HDR.jpg
No mulch
No mulch
 
L. Johnson
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Posts: 1665
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
747
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Got some labor done today.

Turned a cedar log into stakes to keep my raised beds from falling apart.
First I cut the lengths with my silky.

Then I split them with an axe and some wedges when necessary.

Then I used my drawknife to smooth the sides to give fungus less surface area to grow on and shaved down to a point to make them easier to drive into the ground.

Then I staked them into the ground to support the sides of the beds.

And I use the shavings to mulch the aisles of the garden.


Gathered some leaf drop off of the concrete retaining wall and added it to the compost heap.



My compost is a bit anaerobic right now. I need to get in and turn the whole thing, but that is a lot of work I don't have time for right now, so it will be put off for another day.
 
L. Johnson
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Posts: 1665
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
747
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New year pruning.

I'm still gradually pruning back all the trees in my garden. I just put in an hour clearing out twisted branches and light blockers.

I've decided to be a bit more aggressive recently, because if any of the decorative plants die from over pruning I can replace them with something edible.

I still have more work to do on the inumaki, a magnolia and the shrubs surrounding them.
 
L. Johnson
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Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
747
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Pushed by my son's interest, we planted a bunch of peach pits in a row beside each other.

We foraged the pits, so I have no idea what kind of peaches, but considering where they were I'm guessing they were decorative peach trees. I don't really need any decorative peach trees... but it will be interesting to see if they come up in the spring. We decided if we get more than one or two we would give them away as gifts.

It's my first attempt at doing tree nursery type gardening, so I think it will be a very good learning experience. Especially if I have partial success.

This might spur me to get some kiwis going too... They might work growing up our back porch.
 
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Location: Isle of Skye, Scotland
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I didn't even know you could get decorative peaches! I suppose decorative cherries, crab apples so why not! You could always look into grafting onto them in furture I suppose.

I suppose you are aware of the potentially vigorous nature of the kiwi vine? I had to evict mine from the polytunnel. It did fruit, but small and sour, we don't really have the heat for it in autumn to ripen and it shaded too much - I did get into a routine to pruning it to maintain it but it didn't survive being transplanted outside. I have thought about other kiwi species (Actinidia arguta and A. kolomitka rather than A. deliciosa) and I may still try them. They are supposed to be less vigorous, earlier fruiting and without the hairy skins of the bigger kiwi fruit.
Just a warning (not my kiwi):


kiwi-smothering-a-tree.JPG
kiwi-smothering-a-tree
kiwi-smothering-a-tree
 
L. Johnson
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Nancy Reading wrote:
I suppose you are aware of the potentially vigorous nature of the kiwi vine?



I wasn't really aware of kiwis in particular, but I'm familiar with how many vining perennials can be overpowering.

That could be a benefit! The real problem is needing a male and female and finding space for both... we have a very small lot and it's already overfull. I'm beginning to consider replacements for edibles.
 
Nancy Reading
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Location: Isle of Skye, Scotland
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There are some self fertile kiwis. Mine was 'Jenny'. It fruited well (took a few years to start flowering) the flowers are really pretty - like large pale apricot apple blossom- so would make a nice bower for a few weeks. I gather the fruit are slightly smaller in self fertile varieties - smaller than a  chicken egg.
Lots of other edible climbers for your climate. I've tried a few, but really need more warmth, even in the tunnel: passionflower, Akebia, five flavour berries. Diascorea might be another option for you - would grow in a large planter perhaps. Hablitizia has very nice edible leaves, doesn't want it too hot and dry.
 
Roses are red. Violets are blue. Some poems rhyme. But this is a tiny ad:

The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers:
http://richsoil.com/cards


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