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Does Anyone Know What This Is?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 123
Location: SW Tennessee Zone 7a average rainfall 52"
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It's growing on a slight slope that faces north in an area that gets full sun all day, and it's happily cohbitating with enough stinging nettle to supply tea to all of North America.
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pollinator
Posts: 2392
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Perilla?

I don't have any experience growing this, but the purple veining makes me suspicious that it is. Does it have a minty/basil type odor when you crush the leaves?
 
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
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No clue, but just looking at the form of the plants (leaves, arrangement, etc) it's something in the mint family. Unfortunately the mint family is quite large, so I know that doesn't help much lol.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1448
Location: northern California
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Is it aromatic? Non-stinging? It might be shiso (Perilla), which I believe is an introduced Asian annual, used as greens or a condiment in various cuisines there. It can vary from pale green to dark purple in color.....
 
Posts: 46
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I also think perilla. It can take over, but propagates itself by seed so "chop and drop" early in the season works pretty well. It also pulls easily.
 
pollinator
Posts: 540
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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I'm also thinking perilla. Funny our perilla patch is growing alongside our stinging nettle patch as well. Personally, I don't care for the taste very much, but my husband likes it. I add it to salads and cooked greens on a regular basis.
 
Judi Anne
Posts: 46
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It does have some toxicity issues especially at the flowering stage. Livestock usually avoid it. It's very invasive here choking out native and useful plants in the area in just a few years. I am leaving a bit here and there, but not much. If it's a new plant in your system I'd recommend keeping an eye on it.
 
Ferne Reid
Posts: 123
Location: SW Tennessee Zone 7a average rainfall 52"
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It looks like you are all correct ... perilla fits. I don't know if it's a new plant since we just moved to this property a few weeks ago. It's spreading rapidly, though, so we'll have to get it under control. Too bad the critters don't like it.

Thanks, everyone!
 
Farmers know to never drive a tractor near a honey locust tree. But a tiny ad is okay:
Two part roundwood timber framing workshop sep 24-29 and oct 1-5
https://permies.com/t/91267/permaculture-projects/part-roundwood-timber-framing-workshop
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