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Goldenberry

 
travis laduke
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I was googling around for something B12 related, and came across this berry. I can't find a good, sciency looking article on them, but all these blog posts and ads say they have vitamin b12, are 16% protein, and are easy to grow.

I searched this forum and didn't get any hits. Oops, there are some mentions of gooseberry which are the same thing?

Seems this berry is making the rounds on the internet, or has previously, as a "superfood"

Anyone have any good info?
 
travis laduke
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also, what kind of math makes this 16% protein?


Food Value Per 100 g of Edible Portion*
Moisture 78.9 g
Protein 0.054 g
Fat 0.16 g
Fiber 4.9 g
Ash 1.01 g
Calcium 8.0 mg
Phosphorus 55.3 mg
Iron 1.23 mg
Carotene 1.613 mg
Thiamine 0.101 mg
Riboflavin 0.032 mg
Niacin 1.73 mg
Ascorbic Acid 43.0 mg
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/cape_gooseberry.html
 
tel jetson
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Location: woodland, washington
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I think it's safe to assume that B[sub]12[/sub] is only synthesized by bacteria.  there may well be ways to get it from plant food, but if so, it's not the plant involved that produces it.

couldn't tell you where that 16% protein figure came from.  certainly not from Purdue.

I had never heard bioflavonoids referred to as "vitamin p" before I browsed that webpage you linked.

gooseberries aren't the same thing.  gooseberries are in the genus Ribescape gooseberries are the same as goldenberries.   the fruits do resemble each other somewhat after the paper comes off the goldenberry.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Physalis or Cape gooseberries (no relation to Euro gooseberries) grow really well in New Zealand.
I have no idea about health benefits, but the plants are tough and thrive in poor soil, the berries are delicious and their papery lanterns look cool.
Importantly, they are usually a hit with kids.
They form very  floppy, straggly, unattractive bushes which can be perennial in a temperate climate, but they fruit better if you  kill them off and start again each year. Luckily, they self-seed prolifically, so that's not a problem.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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in the store today they were selling some berries by the pint that were labeled as "goldenberry"...dont'know what they were but they were too many  $ for me to buy
 
Kay Bee
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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pippimac wrote:
Physalis or Cape gooseberries (no relation to Euro gooseberries) grow really well in New Zealand.
I have no idea about health benefits, but the plants are tough and thrive in poor soil, the berries are delicious and their papery lanterns look cool.
Importantly, they are usually a hit with kids.
They form very  floppy, straggly, unattractive bushes which can be perennial in a temperate climate, but they fruit better if you  kill them off and start again each year. Luckily, they self-seed prolifically, so that's not a problem.

are they related to tomatillos?  certainly the same kind of behavior - let one tomatillo plant set seed and you're set for life!
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Tomatillos are physalis too. I've tried to grow them, but it doesn't seem to get hot enough round here.
 
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