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James Everett
Posts: 94
Location: Gaines County, Texas South of Seminole, Tx zone 7b
3
dog greening the desert trees
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Are there any IC or Eco Villages in the region up between the area of Midland/Odessa Texas up to Lubbock, Texas over to Hobbs, NM areas. Looked around but I haven't really found any but just wondering if there are in these areas looking to set up something or already have something going on. Right now all I have is 30 acres of really challenging land to work with and was wanting to see what people are doing in this area and looking to have people that don't have land of their own that want experience on changing the land for a better future. I see most are 3 or more hours away for the most part from me now.
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2392
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I wish you good luck in your endeavor, but this may be a crickets post -- no one around to answer.

I lived for a while in Carlsbad, NM, and I remember passing through Seminole on the occasional trip to Lubbock. Sparse is a good way to describe the area, and the people that are there are of a conservative bent, not many of them willing to try changing anything on the promise of a better future.

But that aside, I'd be interested to hear your ideas about bringing permaculture to the High Plains. Permaculture depends a lot on establishing trees, and places like Notrees, TX sure could use it. It wouldn't take much for trees to get established; once they do get established and can get their tap root down far enough, they do find enough water to live. Because of the Pecos river running through it, Carlsbad had vegetation like places many hundreds of miles to the east. The possibility of irrigating trees for the first five years or so until they could get established seemed to make all the difference.
 
James Everett
Posts: 94
Location: Gaines County, Texas South of Seminole, Tx zone 7b
3
dog greening the desert trees
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I know what you mean. It seems like it will be a good challenge for me. I mean 40+ feet of caliche to work with on 30 acres. well almost that I do have 8 Acres or so down in the drawn that seem to be more sandy loam which is growing some trees quite well with out help from me. I have notice in the past two years me just throwing seed out for cover has been saying greener through longer from the hot weather here. first it was just clovers and ryegrasses. but this fall I am going through with wildflower mixes this time to add more color. Also about to add in Comfrey and Diakon Radishes to see how well they can tear through the land. Until I can afford to get equipment in to do earthworks this is how I am slowly getting things done.
 
Barbara Allen
Posts: 8
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Hey there! I am near Amarillo, Tx! I love the permies web site, and I'm excited to see someone in these parts wanting to a start sustainable living project. I just have 2.5 acres between Amarillo and Canyon but since my husband passed away I have been needing lots of help. I believe that with a few people, or maybe just one good handyman, I could grow some veggies, herb, chickens; and it is very quiet and peaceful-well not as peaceful as where you are James! Keep up the good work! Barbara
 
James Everett
Posts: 94
Location: Gaines County, Texas South of Seminole, Tx zone 7b
3
dog greening the desert trees
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I am slowly convincing some of my friends to help me. some want to use my land for planting trees for their fire places in the winter but also as my land stays greener each year they are seeing the difference. That and the explosion of rabbits and quail moving on the land now with the neighbor a few tracks down making a pond for water source. Which is one of my later plans. Like you I will need help I have 30 Acres and no equipment to work it.
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2392
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James Everett wrote: Like you I will need help I have 30 Acres and no equipment to work it.


What is that sepp holzer quote about not having a pig? Oh yes,

Then you must do the pig's work.


I, too, would like to alter the landscape, but without having to apply my muscle power to do it. What helps (as you are discovering) is judicious seeding of certain plants. Let THEM do the work; let daikon radishes drill down and till the soil; let oregano spread like a living mulch and retain soil moisture; let hyperaccumulators send their roots down to mine soil minerals and bring them up to the surface for other plants to use.

The problem in your region is that the low level of natural precipitation cuts down the number of choices of plants to select from -- you need plants adapted to arid conditions. I have less of a problem in that area and had good success the first time I planted tillage radishes in the fall. They came up and overwintered and did a good job on the soil compaction. Now that the Texas drought is over (for a while), you may be able to get good results with daikon/tillage radish if you broadcast it in September. One thing I would suggest adding in with the radish mix is mustard. I had Fusarium endemic to my piece of dirt, and it killed all manner of plants I tried the first year. The glucosinolates in the mustard did a good job of killing off the Fusarium, and since doing that, I can plant tomatoes and eggplant without seeing them curl over and die.

Another thing I have done is to get much more familiar with the weeds that are naturalized to my area. Some I eradicate at first sight (nightshade, poison ivy, and mare's tail), some I tolerate (oxalis and dock), and some I actively encourage (chamber bitter, passionflower, and blackberries). Here the work to eradicate is more difficult than the work to "be fruitful and multiply" since that's what weeds like to do. You have to have a keen eye and go over your land often to catch things you don't want before they get too well established. Maybe if you took a closer look at some of the weeds that are thriving on a part of your land, you might find it advantageous to give them a little help taking over the rest of it.
 
Brett Andrzejewski
gardener
Posts: 318
Location: Buffalo, NY
29
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I have some connections once you get to the more middle part of NM (ABQ/SF).
 
James Everett
Posts: 94
Location: Gaines County, Texas South of Seminole, Tx zone 7b
3
dog greening the desert trees
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Brett Andrzejewski wrote:I have some connections once you get to the more middle part of NM (ABQ/SF).

yeah I am further down to the SE corner of NM Border Town next to me is Hobbs,NM
 
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