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Landrace Seed Success!

 
Missy Brown
Posts: 7
Location: Central Arkansas
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I'm pretty used to "messing up" in my garden by missing harvests (I'm disabled, some days it just doesn't happen). I don't get too upset; I make a lot of great compost that way, my garden ends up self-seeding a lot of things, and I consider the over-abundance an affirmation that I must be doing something right. But I was a little peeved with myself for letting the "green beans" go too long. Until I realized they weren't beans at all. I finally found the faded popsicle stick that let me know that they were "Peas, C(unintelligible-writing)", which didn't help much at all until I popped one open.

They're the calico crowder peas I was given to grow out 3 years ago (yes, I'm a terrible person) from a group called Conserving Arkansas Agricultural Heritage. The seed was saved a few years before I received it, so I didn't expect they would germinate. For the past two months, they've really been more of a nuisance and rabbit magnet than anything...the vines refuse to be controlled or confined and have woven themselves through the tomatoes and cucumbers.

I picked some of them too early thinking I was having green beans for dinner, but I figure I'll snap 'em and throw them in with the shelled peas and some pork trimmings and they'll be just fine. I have several more pounds of "green beans I guess I'll save for seed) to go pick, but I shelled a few this morning. Even had some that dried on the plant to put up for next year's garden, leaving me with more seed than I started with from the first harvest alone.

This is the first heritage/land race seed that I've been able to grow out successfully, and it's a pretty big deal to me. Like, I cried when I realized what I was holding. This seed has been saved and passed down through generations of an Ozark Mountains family since before the civil war. That's nearly 200 years of genetic selection that has survived droughts, floods, hard times, and rough country. It's quite humbling from a gardener's perspective.
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CAAH Calico Crowder Peas
 
Zach Muller
gardener
Posts: 776
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
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Congrats missy that is really neat! Its also good that the plant is so rugged and Aggressive, now you have more options on how to plant the next round. I treat my saved seeds as totally sacred and they are only a few generations along, i cant imagine holding a seed with a 200 year known history.

Now where and when are you planting them? Not with the toms and cukes i guess.
 
diana todd
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Fabulous! a great way for the land to take of you!!!
 
Susan Pruitt
Posts: 43
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Kudos Missy, for getting out there, persevering and "trying" to do the right thing :) Enough with the self-deprecation !!!
Anyhoo, congrats on the peas - would you consider selling some of your seed? I'm in N.C. also on a 7b-8 cusp and am always looking for hardy, native plants that might act like perennials because I relate to being an inconsistent garden keeper - haha

Blessings, Susan
 
Jan Cooper
Posts: 60
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Missy,

If I can send you an envelope with postage stamps for seed, may I do so? You would need to personally send me a message: I would need your address.

I can add 5 dollars for your trouble. I teach Adult Ed gardening. The gardeners would love to try them. Let me know.

 
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