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Mystery Flower

 
Posts: 52
Location: The dry side of Spokane, USDA zone 6ish, 2300' elevation.
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What is this? It has been volunteering in our garden since we moved in two years ago. It's sort of pretty, but not quite pretty enough to keep if it doesn't have another use.





 
pollinator
Posts: 180
Location: Washington Timber Country
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Pink sedum, I think. We have a bunch courtesy the previous homeowners.

A little Googling says this kind isn't really a Sedum, but Hylotelephium. We haven't found any use for ours yet, other than pretty flowers and biomass.
 
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Posts: 1651
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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I've got some of that too, and yes I used to call it sedum but recently learned that it's hylotelephium. Everything says it's edible, so I tried a leaf recently, but didn't find it pleasant. That was a mature leaf in midsummer though. Maybe the early spring leaves are tasty, I don't know. It's extremely easy to grow and to propagate. Mine started from a broken bit of a houseplant that I threw on top of the mulch in my greenhouse. The greenhouse goes a little below freezing for nights all winter but this thing just hunkers under the mulch and then bursts forth in spring. I agree the flowers aren't interesting.
 
Posts: 50
Location: Ben Lomond, CA
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The leaves are edible, though you may not like it enough to make a meal of it. It is an *excellent* late-summer/fall nectar source for bees, butterflies, and other insects, though, which is why I plant it willy-nilly around our property. Easy to propagate!
 
E Reimer
Posts: 52
Location: The dry side of Spokane, USDA zone 6ish, 2300' elevation.
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Now that you mention it, there are a ton of bees working the flowers. That's reason enough for me to leave it alone for now. Thanks!
 
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