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egg shells and avocado skins

 
Rose Pinder
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Location: Otago, New Zealand
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The two things that hold their own in my compost and I find a bit annoying when I'm using it at the other end. Any suggestions? (I warm to cold compost usually, and am unlikely to do hot, fast composting).

A good use for avocado stones would be welcome too (7 or 8 a week).
 
Nicole Alderman
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Location: Pacific Northwest
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duck forest garden hugelkultur
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I don't know what to do about avocado peals--we have a plethera of them and their pits, too . I'm hoping someone else has some good ideas!

As for the egg shells, you can dry and then grind them up to a dust to add to the compost or soil as an amendment. If you have chickens or ducks, you can also break up those shells and feed them back to the poultry to give them calcium. We collect ours in an open container until there's enough to bake in the oven. During the winter we keep the container on top of the soapstone on our woodstove and when it's full we crush them up and give them to our ducks to eat. We crush them so they are small enough to not resemble eggs. From my understanding, the shells don't have to be baked to be fed to the poultry, but they certainly are easier to crumble that way!
 
Chris Barton
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I agree with Nicole about the egg shells. I used to just put them back through the compost again with fresh stuff and they'd eventually break down but now I grind them up for soil addition. Good for tomatoes etc.
Avocado stones don't seem to break down unless they're sliced in half. It's quite satisfying to use a decent knife and cut them up. The avocado skins I put in the wormery as the composting worms seem to like them.
 
David Good
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I just crush the eggshells in my hands and sprinkle them in my garden beds. I view the pieces as slow-release calcium fertilizer for the plants. Eventually they disappear.
 
John Gylleck
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avocado stones germinate in my worm compost. then die. then seem to be eaten.
 
David Good
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"avocado stones germinate in my worm compost. then die. then seem to be eaten."

I'm not sure why that would be the case, but that trio of sentences would make a good title for a Fiona Apple album.
 
Rose Pinder
Posts: 408
Location: Otago, New Zealand
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Tiger worms love to breed in avocado skins, not sure why that is. I always find nests of them. The stones never seem to break down though, I wonder if that's the variety of avo or how I manage the worm bin.

I'm gardening in containers at the moment, so reckon I should probably go back to burning most egg shells and then maybe hand crushing a few for mixing into soil.
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