• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

composting toxic plants  RSS feed

 
Posts: 300
Location: CT zone 5b
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm so glad David is here and I can ask this- I have tons of yews that I'm removing, but worry about residual toxicity as they decay. I've mostly been shredding/ chipping the branches and needles. Will the taxine ever break down?

I'm also growing castor beans and don't know what I'm gonna do with the plant residue. Looking for suggestions! Thanks
 
gardener
Posts: 583
Location: Equatorial tropics
62
books forest garden
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Will,

I actually use castor as a chop-and-drop plant in my food forest and haven't heard of any issues with its toxicity persisting long-term.

As for yews, I admit my ignorance as to the decay rate of the taxine alkaloid in the soil; however, nature recycles yews all the time. So long as you don't eat the compost, I wouldn't worry about it.
 
Will Holland
Posts: 300
Location: CT zone 5b
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm mostly worried about picking those substances back up via mushrooms. From what little I've read online, mushrooms will pick up the taxine and make them not safe to eat.

Glad to know the castor residue isn't a big deal!
 
David Good
gardener
Posts: 583
Location: Equatorial tropics
62
books forest garden
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
@Will

I think we need to call a scientist and find out - "Hi, could you do some lab work on these boletes for me?"
 
Posts: 9
Location: Illinois
food preservation solar wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Will,

I am researching a similar question, (and may end up posting here)- in the meantime, I found this.

http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/forests/woodpro/technotes/toxicity-of-yew-wood-and-roots
 
What does a metric clock look like? I bet it is nothing like this tiny ad:
Tomatoes! Ha! Anyone can grow that. Amaze your neighbors, grow your own shirt!
https://permies.com/wiki/92731/fiber-arts/Homegrown-Linen-transforming-flaxseed-fibre
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!