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Home pasteurizing milk - how to avoid scums  RSS feed

 
Seva Tokarev
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Location: Minnesota, zone 4, loamy sand
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I recently started buying raw milk from an amish farm because of its superior quality.
However, I do not venture to consume it raw (at least unless it just has been collected,) so I boil it before putting into fridge and consume it in several days.
During the process, there occurs scum (or broth? I am not sure what's it's called in English) -- a thin layer of milk casein coagulated during the process.
To my knowledge, that's totally benign, but I haven't seen a child who doesn't loath it -- at any rate, my kids do.

So I have to filter it out, which I do not enjoy myself at all.

Are there other ways of pasteurizing people are using?
 
Mike Feddersen
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As a teenager we lived next to a farm family that milked and every week or so we would get
a gallon or two of fresh raw milk. I definitely did not care for the yellow gunk that was on top,
mom would shake the jar to help stir it up. It was definitely different. I remember having fresh
peaches covered in cream, it was so good but rich too.

I found a video on Youtube of a guy using a metal mesh coffee strainer to strain his milk, maybe that
would be helpful, I know I was thinking cheesecloth would work.

I found some more information on storage and leaving a link to that google search HERE.



If you keep watching the guy aboves videos he shows making butter, honey butter and buttermilk the easy way.



The color of the milk changes with what the cows eat. The more grass they eat, the more yellow the milk/butter,
as grass has beta carotene. The more grain they eat, the whiter the cream/butter.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Seva: Home scale pasteurization of milk is typically done at temperatures much below boiling: For example 145 F for 30 minutes is typical.
 
Seva Tokarev
Posts: 79
Location: Minnesota, zone 4, loamy sand
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Thanks for replies!

Mike: no, it's a totally different aspect.
Joseph: yes, I suppose pasteurizing at lower temperature might prevent coagulation. Need to read more about it. For some reason, they always heated milk to boiling where I am coming from.
 
Ann Torrence
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Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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Most of the raw milk we use is for cheese-making, and I prefer not to pasteurize. But if I am making a soft, short-term cheese like a formal blanc (esp. one that I plan to serve to the immuno-challenged like our 90 year old WWII vet friend) I will pasteurize. Because heating milk to temperatures above 160 changes the shapes of the proteins and makes it unsuitable for cheese-making, I use Joseph's method, 30 min at 145. Get a good cheese-making thermometer and calibrate it by measuring the temp of boiling water. Adjust as necessary for your altitude.
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