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tel jetson
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I'm satisfied that a good rocket mass heater doesn't create much in the way of carbon monoxide and much less particulate matter than more common wood-burning appliances, but what about the other elements in the wood? what about some of the more common ions in wood smoke, such as chlorine, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, sodium ammonium, and potassium? where do they go?

this is outside my expertise, but it isn't obvious to me that the more complete and/or hotter combustion in rocket mass heaters would decrease the generation and release of these ions. the relatively longer exhaust runs could allow more time for some of them to precipitate out of the exhaust, but has that been documented anywhere or, for that matter, investigated?
 
Dale Hodgins
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No answers here.  Just further questions and musings.
.....
Commercial power plants run at some pretty high temperatures and they still produce particulate and other pollutants.

 Many government-funded studies on wood smoke have been conducted. Products of combustion are well documented.  In the absence of RMH testing, which many innovators cannot afford to do, or do not want to do, I think we must assume that pollutants are produced.
.....
 Extremely high temperatures, may increase the levels of some pollutants. With the high temperatures and pressure in a combustion engine, compounds are created from nitrogen.
 
tel jetson
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Dale Hodgins wrote:Extremely high temperatures, may increase the levels of some pollutants. With the high temperatures and pressure in a combustion engine, compounds are created from nitrogen.


I asked Ernie about NOx last winter. he said they can definitely be produced if an RMH is built such that it burns really hot. his solution was to not build them that way, though I think he also mentioned increasing latency at the top of the heat exchange portion. seems reasonable, but the general RMH consensus among lay folks might be that hotter is better.

don't ask VW how to reduce NOx.
 
tel jetson
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this question came up as I was reading a Finnish study of pollution due to burning wood. masonry heaters were mentioned as common sources of the pollutants measured.
 
Satamax Antone
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Tel, may be that's a question to ask Karl at Donkey's. He's quite good with his chemistry.
 
tel jetson
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Satamax Antone wrote:Tel, may be that's a question to ask Karl at Donkey's. He's quite good with his chemistry.


you feel like bringing it up over there? I've reached my personal limit for forum memberships.
 
shilo kinarty
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link
 
tel jetson
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shilo kinarty wrote:link


that test seems to concern mostly fine particles, though I can't read even a little German so I could easily be mistaken. fine particulate matter is interesting and possibly related, but I'm not wondering about the products of incomplete combustion. no matter how complete the combustion, there will be components of the exhaust that are not carbon dioxide and water, because wood is made of more elements than carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen.
 
shilo kinarty
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I refer to my question about sox and nox and to the no answers.
 
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