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Grafting onto Hawthorn - Crataegus

 
herbert prohl
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]Grafting onto Hawthorn - Crataegus[/size]


Following is a list of fruit species to graft onto hawthorn root stock... (all from the Rosaceae family).

If you have wild growing hawthorns why not graft your favourite fruit tree onto them.

I will not graft all the hawthorns growing here, the oldest will remain as a valuable resource for domestic bees and all other insects looking for pollen and nectar in spring and also for the medical use of the flowers & fruit.

Grafting low will prevent too many wild suckers growing below the graft union and will allow to mount soil up above the graft union to allow formation of own roots for difficult graft unions like pear or juneberry ...

1. All "other" Crataegus interesting for bigger fruits, e.g.: Crataegus arnoldiana, Crataegus azarolus, Crataegus durobrivensis, Crataegus ellwangeriana, Crataegus missouriensis, Crataegus schraderiana, Crataegus submollis, Crataegus succulenta, Crataegus tanacetifolia

2. German medlar, (Mespilus germanica), used by nurseries, easy.

3. Quince, (Cydonia oblonga), (Chaenomeles cathayensis), also as intermediate graft/inter-stock for pears & apples, quince overgrows hawthorn, but to a lesser degree than pear, easy.

4. Mountain ash, (Sorbus aucuparia), e.g. cultivar "Concentra" ...

5. Juneberry, (Amélanchier ...) - best grafted low and after a few years mount soil up above the graft union to allow formation of own roots, easy.

6. Chokeberry, (Aronia melanocarpa), also commonly called black chokeberry, best grafted low and after a few years mount soil up above the graft union to allow formation of own roots.

7. Pear, (Pyrus communis), try the varieties "Joséphine de Malines" or "Beurré Le Brun" as first (or final), intermediate graft and then your choice of pear, otherwise best grafted low and after a few years mount soil up above the graft union to allow formation of own roots, pear overgrows hawthorn and might need a tutor to avoid breaking at the graft union.
http://mapassionduverger.fr/greffage/greffage-sur-aubepine/

8. Service tree, (Sorbus domestica), not easy.

9. Japanese medlar, (Eriobotrya japonica), adds cold hardiness to medlar, not easy.

Where to get scion wood? Here, the goldmine for scion wood: http://fruitiers.net/, if you need help signing in let me know.

Have fun grafting ,;- )


Please note: Hawthorn is a fire-blight host.
 
David Livingston
steward
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Location: Anjou ,France
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I have grafted medlars ( neflier ) on to hawthorne and found that quite easy even for a beginner such as myself . I dont think I will bother with quince as it roots so easy and often has its own little ones I can trans plant

David
 
herbert prohl
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Hi David,

I have got plenty of hawthorns I can graft on, scions are fast growing on a already developed root system.
Here are the scions:

http://www.fruitiers.net/bourse.php

better page than the initial link.

,:- )

Herb
 
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