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My AGH gave birth to seven piglets in western North Carolina.

 
edwin lake
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This litter is from registered AGHs. We are selling some of the piglets for breeding if anyone is in the area.

The sow mother is fantastic. She is exceedingly careful not to crush her babies.

The boar is gentle and friendly.

These are smaller than regular hogs, which is preferable due to our situation on a small scale homestead.
 
allen lumley
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Edwin Lake : Young piglets born now will need to be wintered over, which for most farmers means store bought feed ! Also most people willing

to make such a move will not be willing to travel far ! You will need to share a little more information about your location to draw prospective

pig farmers ! The links below should help you now and in the future :


http://www.permies.com/t/43625/introductions/Universal

http://www.permies.com/t/34193/tnk/permies-works-links-threads

Hopefully this is timely and useful, for the good of the Crafts ! Big AL


 
Jami McBride
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Or another way to look at it -

This is the best time to buy these smaller breed piglets. They eat little at this age so growing them up over the winter to mature breeding age (6mo.) or through to next Fall to a butchering weight (150lb +) is the most economical strategy. But you may need to inform your future buyers about the growth rates of your smaller breed and how they differ from the larger breeds. Spring piglet purchases are better for the standard/big breeds - those you only keep for a few months over the spring/summer and then butcher.

Still there are times of the year when the pig market is lagging no matter the season, a back up plan for surprise piglets is always a good idea. I like to barter weaned piglets for culling/slaughter of animals ready to be dropped off at the butcher for cut n' wrap (lamb, etc.)

These smaller breeds do make good yard pets too.

Enjoy your new additions ~ they are soooo much fun!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hua Edwin, so you're shoats will be ready in January?
We like to pick up babies at 12-14 weeks old, when they are fully weaned.
Where are you located, I might be interested in a gilt but I need to be able to make the round trip in a day or two.

Could you pm me a copy of the pedigree?

We have a good Boar and two gilts right now, we won't be breeding until probably January as ours will be old enough at that time.

Thanks.

B. Redhawk
 
edwin lake
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:hua Edwin, so you're shoats will be ready in January?
We like to pick up babies at 12-14 weeks old, when they are fully weaned.
Where are you located, I might be interested in a gilt but I need to be able to make the round trip in a day or two.

Could you pm me a copy of the pedigree?

We have a good Boar and two gilts right now, we won't be breeding until probably January as ours will be old enough at that time.

Thanks.

B. Redhawk


Ciao Brian:

I bought the gilt (Comfrey) from Cathy Payne down in Georgia. Cathy was on a couple Voices podcasts. Comfrey is beautiful. I put their pedigree at the two links here: Comfrey

The shoat Yarrow we bought from Tamara and Charles Ray out of your neck of the woods, Arkansas. Yarrow

I think we have some good genetics in our offspring. We would be delighted to sell you one of the gilts or maybe we can make a trade. Here's a link to our specific location onGoogle Maps. Maybe we could meet up in Nashville, TN.

We are not going to wean the piglets until they naturally would stop nursing, around 12 weeks or so.

We have an environment with mulberry, persimmon, beech, and white oak trees on 15 acres. We also have about five acres of mixed grass pastures in use with horses, plus space around our homestead. Our plan is to rotate the pigs around our pastures and homestead, including through wooded paddocks and finish them out on the persimmons and acorns around October and November next year. They will be about ten months old at that point. AGH grow slower than commercial pigs and they take that long to reach market weight.

AGH don't need a lot of supplemental feeding. But we have dairy goats and chickens so they get eggs and cheese and souring milk, whey, etc. Also, we have too many deer around here so if any wander around me, I shoot them and use the cuttings for the pigs as well. Our supplemental grain comes from either Reedy Fork farm, or New Country in Virginia. GMO free.

Unfortunately, we don't have any shoats in this group. Only three barrows now.
 
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