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Rattlesnakes

 
                  
Posts: 2
Location: Northern California
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I was rumaging under large zukini leaves in my greenhouse yesterday looking for fruit when i saw a rattlesnake coiled up just inches from my hand. I am guessing it was in there looking for mice who were drawn by the hay bales and mulch that is here and there.  Besides engaging in the long tedious process of trapping the mice with live traps and relocating them, and cleaning up the hiding places that bring the mice that bring the snakes, any other ideas? I have heard that cats get rid of mice and snakes, and that chickens and pigs chase off snakes as well, but chickens would not last long with the bobcats and mountain lions i fear, nor would the pigs be too good for my gardens, so are cats the best option? I am thinking that the sulphur ring method, if it even works, would be impractical for me with 50 inches of rain each winter and an acre garden to encircle. So any ideas?
 
Tyler Ludens
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Cats do a good job of keeping away mice, if you don't want snakes.  But you may end up with both cats and snakes.

If you've only had the one rattler, I wouldn't worry about it much.

 
                        
Posts: 148
Location: South Central Idaho
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Rattlers travel in pairs .. if you see one and relocate it .. its mate will be where he was last .. the end of its trail so to speak .. in three or four days and you are a "step up" if you know how they operate.

We rented a house in rattler country and the back light switch had a hole where a little lizard slept. If he was out on top of the switch during the winter .. we saw rattlers. If he was a no show .. so were the rattlers.
 
Tyler Ludens
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We had a rattler in our asparagus patch a couple years ago, who spooked me when I leaned down to pull a weed and saw her there.  She was trying hard not to be seen!  Seeing her encouraged me to clear up a bit on our paths and put down light-colored gravel so we could spot snakes better, but I haven't seen another rattler here (or the same one again).  Lots of other kinds, which is fine.  I try to remember to stomp around so they'll know I'm coming. 
 
paul wheaton
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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I think the best way to keep poisonous snakes out of an area is to have it heavily populated with non-poisonous snakes.  The non-poisonous snakes eat all the snake food and the area is then of no interest to the poisonous snakes.

 
                              
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Yes, King Snakes are a great choice!
 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
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rattle snakes also taste pretty good and ain't as hard to catch as others cause they make noise
 
Kathleen Sanderson
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Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
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I've heard that turkeys will clear an area of snakes, but don't know if it actually works, nor if they would work for you.  You might need a livestock guardian dog to protect the poultry.

Kathleen
 
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