• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Sounds like cows reduce effects of farting

 
hans muster
Posts: 24
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://adf.farmonline.com.au/news/nationalrural/agribusiness/general-news/ets-lifeline-soils-capable-of-absorbing-cattle-methane/1612492.aspx?storypage=0

According to this article, if you keep cows on a healthy soil you can eat a lot of beans, as the soil compensates for more than their own farts.

Joke beside, the article states that bacteria in healthy soil oxidize more methane than the methane produced by cows on the same area. Not astonishing, but another argument for not removing grazing animals.
 
Kittum Daniel
Posts: 40
Location: NE Oklahoma
toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That is interesting.

I was a bit offended when someone was suggesting a methane tax on cattle a few years back. I can see where methane and ammonia are issues in bigger confined operations such as feed lots and "dry lot" dairies but those are not the norm.

My question is that if cattle and other ruminants are dangerous then why wasn't the North American Continent destroyed when there was millions and millions of buffalo?
 
Kelly Smith
Posts: 699
Location: In a rain shadow - Fremont County, Southern CO
18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kittum Daniel wrote:That is interesting.

I was a bit offended when someone was suggesting a methane tax on cattle a few years back. I can see where methane and ammonia are issues in bigger confined operations such as feed lots and "dry lot" dairies but those are not the norm.

My question is that if cattle and other ruminants are dangerous then why wasn't the North American Continent destroyed when there was millions and millions of buffalo?


even if the numbers were equal to those of the past - they animals arent able to move in the same manner they used to.

barb wire has stopped herd migration, putting the onus on the animal manager.


like salatin said - we figured out barbed wired and grain production before we figured out polywire and portable watering systems.


i agree, properly managed cows are a benefit to the planet. ill continue to chuckled at those who think they should go away (it implies there is only 1 way to raise animals, and that way is destructive)
 
Micky Ewing
Posts: 102
Location: Merrickville, Ontario
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No surprise to hear that soil microbes are once again found to be pivotal in keeping our environment healthy. The thread creator seems to be making a big leap in crediting the cows with this effect though. The researchers themselves made no such statement. The furthest Prof. Adams went in the article was to speculate that the methane oxidation would probably turn out to be most pronounced in soil with good structure and rich in organic matter. Mob grazing can do wonders for soil structure and organic content, but that's still far from being the standard livestock management method -- here in Canada at least.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 8970
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
130
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think the op position might be that appropriate grazing helps create healthy soils. Personally I don't see it as much of a leap.

 
Kittum Daniel
Posts: 40
Location: NE Oklahoma
toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tyler Ludens wrote:I think the op position might be that appropriate grazing helps create healthy soils. Personally I don't see it as much of a leap.



I agree. It is that simple.
 
today's feeble attempt to support the empire
Got Permaculture games? Yes! 66 cards, infinite possibilities::
www.FoodForestCardGame
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic