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Can you eat sprouted walnuts?  RSS feed

 
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The Acorns and Eat 'Em book says you can eat sprouted acorns. The book says an acorn with a 2 inch long sprout is fine, as long as the acorn nut meat hasn't turned green. This seems like a good idea because it should neutralize enzyme inhibitors in them. Sprouting should also make it easier to remove the acorn shell. I have acorns from a blue oak and am going to try sprouting them by burying them in sand outside over the winter.

I want to put some black walnuts in with the acorns. Has anyone eaten walnuts that were left in their shells and sprouted in the ground? I am assuming that I should not eat any walnuts that have turned green. Are there any other things to worry about with eating sprouted walnuts?
 
pollinator
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Since no one has spoken up about walnuts, I will speak up about a close relative -- pecans. I come across sprouted pecans all the time, and while I don't eat them, my chickens sure like them.

All the health food types go on about how good sprouts are for you, but they are generally an impatient sort. If it doesn't give a handful of angel-hair like sprouts in 3 days time, they are not going to wait. It probably takes several weeks of cold, wet conditions to get walnuts and pecans to sprout, but if they could do it in 2-3 days, you would see them trying it.
 
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Not sure if this is the info you are looking for but if you clean off the outer slime from the black walnuts, let them dry for a few weeks crack them get out the nut meats and then soak them in salt water and dehydrate them you have "crispy nuts" which is the wapf suggested way to consume many varieties of nuts. As you say the sprouting (in this case) soaking neutralizes anti-nutrients and harmful substances in the nuts making them better digested and really nutritious. I tried black walnuts but they are really really hard to get the nut meats out, eventually gave up and went to buying most of those nuts soaked already. Someday would like to have nut trees with nuts I can harvest easily, right now I am in an area with lots of black walnut trees so I tried it with those.
 
pollinator
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Perhaps I should start a new thread instead, but I will comment here.

I've got about 70 liters of walnuts, not sure what to do now. Do I just let them sit?  Do I need to remove the shells for storage? Do I need to roast them, or soak them in water first? If yes to soaking, roasting and shelling, in what sequence?
 
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Chad Sentman wrote:Perhaps I should start a new thread instead, but I will comment here.

I've got about 70 liters of walnuts, not sure what to do now. Do I just let them sit?  Do I need to remove the shells for storage? Do I need to roast them, or soak them in water first? If yes to soaking, roasting and shelling, in what sequence?



Take the green hulls off, if you haven't already.  They'll turn black and soak bitter tannins into the nuts inside the shell otherwise.  Keep them in their shells for longer storage.  If you have central heating, put them in baskets or paper bags near your heat registers and stir them up once in a while to dry them out.  They'll go moldy if you don't stir them.  If you have a woodstove, hang them in mesh bags somewhere you've got a warm draft from the stove.

Shelled and roasted nuts need to be kept refrigerated so they don't go rancid.  Best to shell and/or roast only what you're going to use.  Some people like to soak nuts to increase their digestibility.  After soaking, you can dehydrate the nuts again to increase their keeping ability.
 
pollinator
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I cant think of any SEED that gets MORE poisonous after it has been sprouted, inclusive of seeds that are called nuts.
In fact sprouting normally makes then less dangerous/poisonous.
 
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