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This helps understand hugelkultur

 
Troy Santos
Posts: 34
Location: Southern Thailand
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This is a 29 minute video from the USDA Forest Service. The first 14 minutes or so are especially useful in understanding the decomposition process of wood. The whole video was cool, and so easy to understand I wonder if the makers targeted school kids. A forest in Oregon, USA is the setting for the video. Discusses the enormous variety of life involved in the decomposition of fallen trees.

Ya gotta wonder, since government bureaucrats understand these things about soil, why is it that the suggested forest practices offered at the end aren't mandated in laws? I'm no fan of government digging into every corner of life, but when the narrow goal of a business it to financially survive and thrive, and they don't see the long term value of their "resources" ... isn't it time to dig in?

I've seen US Soil Conservation Videos heavily promoting no-til farming ... yet there is a similarity in that what the experts say is not the law. Corporate lobbyists have more influence over lawmakers than the people doing the research. Kinda gets ya pissed off.
 
Roberto pokachinni
Posts: 677
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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Thanks for posting this resource. There is, indeed, a lot of useful information in this for the person wanting to understand what is going on in a hugulkultur, or at least in dead woody material (as the wood is not buried in the processes described). The information would be of interest to anybody wanting to understand the internal biological processes that are inherent in breaking down course woody debris.

Corporate lobbyists have more influence over lawmakers than the people doing the research. Kinda gets ya pissed off.
yep. the thing is, those lawmakers are not making nearly the money that a lobbyist does, and the majority of lawmakers go on to doing lobby work after they 'leave' politics. The truth is that lobbyists are a level of the government, a more advanced level that supersedes the level of those elected to power.
 
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