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Older home roof replacement  RSS feed

 
Linda Listing
Posts: 43
Location: Western PA
urban
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My 1920s city house will need a new roof soon. Really soon. I was reading Bioshelter Market Garden: A Permaculture Farm by Darrell Frey. I found a reference regarding using roof water from an asphalt shingle roof will have high zinc and metal levels as it starts to detriorate. That squashed all my ideas of routing it into my garden. I don't need to deal with the health issues that causes but my city water probably isn't great for the garden either (for other reasons) So needing a new roof is an excellent time for change. That said, Joseph Jenkins Slate Roof book isn't in print yet. What are my options? I am rather new at this. I am older and on a budget. The house is a mock English tudor typical of Pittsburgh with a steep pitch. I am also not sure how much weight the roof could hold. Be a great time to add in solar features too. Suggestions, and even contractors welcomed. Local contractors are stubborn when it comes down to something that doesn't come out of a box at Lowes nor do they like having a woman telling them what to do. Help?
 
R Scott
Posts: 3358
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Metal roof, if allowed by department of make you sad. Lightest color you can get away with. Safe for water catchment, light, low snow load (it slides off), and heat bounces off.

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I agree with the metal roof. If you have a small simple house, it won't be too expensive. We had wind damage to our asphalt shingle roof and the estimate for repairs was just under our insurance deductible, so we said "screw it" and got a metal roof, put on over the existing shingles. It makes the roof horribly slippery, so that my husband doesn't want to clean the chimney himself anymore, but aside from that, I see no drawbacks.

To solve the roof-too-slippery-to-clean-the-chimney problem, we hired a chimney sweep to clean it from inside the house. Well worth the money.
 
John Wolfram
Posts: 655
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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About 6 years ago I put a metal roof on my house. In general, the quotes for the metal roof ranged from twice as a much as a high end shingle roof to three times as much as an asphalt shingle roof. While the initial price was higher, at least back then there was a rather substantial tax credit for reflective/energy efficient roofs, and being hail-resistant by home owner's insurance went down by about $100 a year. Also, the roof still looks as good as the day it went on.

I don't know if they have spread that far east, but Midwest Manufacturing / Menard's seemed to have the best prices on materials for a metal roof. Also, if you get a metal roof, spend the extra few bucks and get a hidden fastener one.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3358
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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The best price I have found BY FAR is from the Amish. Worth a drive to a community if you have one nearby.
 
Mike Cantrell
Posts: 555
Location: Mid-Michigan
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bee books duck food preservation forest garden hunting solar trees
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Joseph Jenkins' slate roof book isn't in print yet?

I read it in 2010!

Second edition at amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0092I75TU/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0092I75TU&linkCode=as2&tag=permiabigcrow-20&linkId=2TE4MY3RIBH5VQIS

Third edition, pre-order at amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0964425823/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0964425823&linkCode=as2&tag=permiabigcrow-20&linkId=L7IKH4JKLD2SPFU4


That said, I'm an insurance adjuster, damaged buildings are my business, and I ALSO say metal's the way to go.
 
Linda Listing
Posts: 43
Location: Western PA
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Mike, Thanks for the links. I had gone to the publisher and this is what they had http://www.chelseagreen.com/the-slate-roof-bible

I like the idea of a metal roof. How long do they typically last? Can solar hot water and solatubes be added later?

 
R Scott
Posts: 3358
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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metal roofs last "forever"--longer than the rest of the house, if properly installed.

Solar can be added later, but I would definitely prepare for it if you know what you are going to do. Some things are way easier to do as you put the roof on than after the fact.
 
Mike Cantrell
Posts: 555
Location: Mid-Michigan
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bee books duck food preservation forest garden hunting solar trees
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Like slate, and UNLIKE shingles, metal roofs are maintainable.

The coating will deteriorate over many years (my roof has a 50 year warranty, so I expect 30 years out of it). When it does, you coat it again!
 
Brett Hammond
Posts: 76
Location: Maryland, USA
5
solar tiny house woodworking
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Galvalum does not put any toxic stuff in your water, so that is better than a painted metal roof, unless the manufacturer can guarentee the paint is safe for plants. The biggest problem with water from a roof, is disease from bird poop. So to be drinkable, it needs to be run through a very good filter. For your garden, it is safest if you water below ground level so it is never exposed to human hands. Spraying on tomatoes, then touching them would spread disease. Much, but not all, of the toxins can be diverted by using a first flush system, that diverts the first 5 gallons or so before going into your cistern or rain barrel. Use the water asap and let the barrel dry out, or get it tested regularly to see how safe it is.

I used to be a roofer and did slate repairs. I would avoid a slate roof because the slates break and you will need to have it repaired every few years. It is also very slippery and gets very hot from the sun.

Where do you live?
 
Brett Hammond
Posts: 76
Location: Maryland, USA
5
solar tiny house woodworking
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Also, slate is much more expensive than metal. I think Galvalum is available at the big box stores now.

I prefer the look of the old fashioned standing seam style, rather than the inexpensive wavy form of metal roof panel, because it is easier to seal the edges from bugs/moisture, and the nails are covered/hidden in most standing seam metal roofs. But they are more expensive.
 
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