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Multiple-species rotation in predator areas?

 
Maja Gustavsson
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Hey all. I'm a little curious about those of you who keep multiple species on pasture rotation in predator-rich areas. I'm looking around for models that might work here (fox and mink can be hunted and controlled here, but wolves, lynx, bear and birds of prey are all fiercely protected by the law) and any tips on books or other resources for models would be appreciated. Right now I'm just shopping around for info, looking at what worked for other people. Thank you!
 
Tracy Kuykendall
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To many unknowns in that question. What prey species, what predator species, etc.. It will depend on how limited you are by regulations etc.. Check with other animal growers/farmers in your area, also with the government agricultural district to see what kind of information is available.
 
Maja Gustavsson
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Tracy Kuykendall wrote:To many unknowns in that question. What prey species, what predator species, etc.. It will depend on how limited you are by regulations etc.. Check with other animal growers/farmers in your area, also with the government agricultural district to see what kind of information is available.


Yeah, I know. I'm just looking for models on a broad scale at the moment. Even if it won't work in my area, there is always something useful you can learn.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I can't condone killing predators, I think it is my responsibility to outwit them. I had trouble with a hawk who took one chicken a day the first year I free-ranged poultry. I've since learned not to let the chickens loose when they are small, although bantams are still vulnerable.

We have a dog ranging throughout our yard. She isn't a Livestock Guard Dog, but her activity keeping the deer and squirrels out of her territory seems to deter predators. I think a Livestock Guard Dog would be the thing to try in an area with heavy predator pressure. Here we need more predators, because the deer, native an exotic, are horribly overpopulated. People hunt and poison predators here, so some are quite rare, though we have Bobcat, Fox, Cougar, Coyote, Raccoon, Ringtail.


 
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