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Do different currant species pollinate each other?  RSS feed

 
Nicole Alderman
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We just bought a "Crandall" clove black current (Ribes odoratum). I'm reading really different things about their pollination. Some say they are self-fertile, some sites say they do better with a pollinator, and some say they need a pollinator to produce fruit. It seems like a good idea to get another pollinator, but what? All the clove currants at the store were Crandall variety (which are all clones). Do I need another clove currant, would another Crandall variety work, or can I use another type of currant for pollination? I have stink currant (Ribes bracteosum) growing on my property. Would that work?

Also, how close does the pollinator need to be?

Thank you for any and all help!
 
Nicole Alderman
pollinator
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duck forest garden hugelkultur
 
David Livingston
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I grow quite a lot of currents and am just getting into growing Jostaberrys and have never had any issues with polonisation . But then I have about thirty plants and four or five different types . Blackcurrents are so easy to grow it baffles me why they are not more popular . I intend to stop when I have fifty .
I feel it unlikey that your other species could hybridize but if the do it could be an interesting offspring and a possible new berry to grow .

David
 
Tyler Miller
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I was listening through the back catalog of You Bet Your Garden last weekend, and the host said that European black currants are self-fertile, while American black currants (clove currants) need a second plant for pollination. I don't think he mentioned anything about cross-pollination between different types of currants.

I imagine that if they need a second plant then a clone wouldn't work, but I really don't know much about this subject. We haven't had pollination issues but we have a bunch of different native and domesticated currants.
 
David Livingston
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Clones wouldnt work as they are the same plant If the plant is not self fertile
 
Nicole Alderman
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Supposedly, the Crandall clove currant is self-fertile, but most sources I read about non-Crandall currants say they are not self-fertile. Is that even possible? Can a non-self-fertile species have a fertile variety?

I also wonder, since there are things like jostaberries (which are a cross between gooseberries and currants), as well as some crosses of the European currants with other species of currants, would my Crandall clove currant be able to be pollinated by a my native stink currant. I have no desire to make new species of currants (especially not ones crossed with stink currant!), I just want my clove currant to make me berries!

Also, how close would they need to be for pollination? Even reading various university publications on growing currants, I see nothing about spacing, probably because currants are relatively new to mass-production, and the focus is on the species that don't require pollinators. I currently have stink currants about 100 yards away from my clove currant. Should I transplant one closer? If so, how close does it need to be? Would 20 or 30 feet be close enough?
 
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