Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Dale's coffee ground and soap, drain cleaner.

 
master pollinator
Posts: 8716
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
714
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is as simple as it sounds.
.....
Kitchen sinks are notorious for clogging up. The drain develops a slimy greasy coating.
.....
 I have used a plunger, a plunger with hot water and soap, and a plunger with hot watersoap and spent coffee grounds.

 This mixture seems to work the best.

 Coffee grounds are mildly abrasive, but they're not likely to stick in the trap the way that sand or something heavier might.

I boil water and mix it with the grounds and some kitchen soap. Just enough to fill the S trap, with a little to spare. The mixture is poured in and the plunger placed to seal off the hole completely. The plunger is moved up and down vigorously for 15 seconds or so. Done.
.....
 I do this as a preemptive measure, from time to time.
.....
These simple tools are great for pulling hair from bathroom drains. See last 2 photos.
https://permies.com/t/54322/recycling-repurposing/Dale-drain-cleaning-tools-thin
20160304_114000.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160304_114000.jpg]
20160304_114918.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160304_114918.jpg]
20160304_114112.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160304_114112.jpg]
Let the residue sit a while. The soapy mess now coats all of the trap and drain.
20160304_121833.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160304_121833.jpg]
20160304_122022.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160304_122022.jpg]
20160304_164447.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160304_164447.jpg]
 
Posts: 19
Location: North Central Ohio
hugelkultur dog urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'll definately try this--thanks
 
gardener
Posts: 2347
Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
303
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Coffee grounds and liquid soap are also one of the best hand cleaners around! I use them anytime I get home and my hands are still dirty from Railway labor. Try it, you will be amazed.
 
Dale Hodgins
master pollinator
Posts: 8716
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
714
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Never thought of it as a hand cleaner. Might stain the skin or nails. I've used that sandy orange stuff but always wondered about what happens down stream. A more pasty mix might do the trick.

I'm going to make some and thicken it with a little flour, as is done with gravy. Mechanics get filthy. My mechanic, John will be the test monkey.
 
gardener & author
Posts: 1678
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
267
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I (briefly) studied oil painting, I found a simple natural hand cleaning method that actually got my hands cleaner than the gick that was provided in the classroom. Just take a bit of cooking oil and rub it thoroughly into your hands, rubbing it into blackened cracks. Then wipe it all off on paper towels and wash with whatever soap is around. Repeat if necessary. It actually worked better than that gick in a tub: was that some kind of grit mixed into a gel with detergent?
 
Posts: 520
Location: Northern Germany (Zone 8a)
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
tried it on our kitchen sink, did work. thank you
 
Roberto pokachinni
gardener
Posts: 2347
Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
303
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Might stain the skin or nails.

Doesn't do either. The coffee is so small an amount, doesn't have to be brewing hot. It just acts as grit in the soap.

I'm going to make some and thicken it with a little flour, as is done with gravy. Mechanics get filthy. My mechanic, John will be the test monkey.

Nothing else is needed. I got the idea from a German bike mechanic. You could make it more pasty, but if you have the dried grounds in your palm and put some liquid soap on it, and use it, it scrubs everything nicely. You don't need much... and if you do need more, then do more.
 
The first person to drink cow's milk. That started off as a dare from this tiny ad:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!