• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

Neutralizing the effects of Juglone in soil

 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is there a way of neutralizing the effects of Juglone in soil. I have several Black walnut trees in my yard and cant seem to get anything else to grow (grass or veggies). I hate to take down a living tree, but this has been very frustrating!
 
pollinator
Posts: 1159
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
99
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some plants are very tolerant and other very susceptible. Several university sites have list. Unfortunately, they aren't complete but still helpful. If you have many mature trees, the shade and competition from the roots could be a problem even with resistant plants. I would seriously consider removing one tree at least. I like diversity. The Juglone in the roots will still be a problem for a while.
 
pollinator
Posts: 278
Location: Central Pennsylvania, USA
52
hugelkultur purity dog forest garden trees books
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am also blessed/cursed with black walnuts.

Here is a great thread to take a look at from a while ago:
Need help with Black Walnut juglone at my new house!

I have quite a few walnuts, and I have decided to work with them instead of against them. Walnuts are quite tasty after all
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 1159
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
99
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's very interesting information about the juglone not being quite as bad as some people think. I've got young walnuts within about 40' or 50'feet of my best young apple, so I'm hoping that will be enough. I did plant a redbud in between to block the roots.
 
Posts: 7
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey permies, After reading some posts on the subject of juglone effects on many plants...and reading that mycelia might help, I found this article. Seems mycelia may enhance the travels of juglone. Am I reading this wrong?


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S003807171400248X

Allelopathy is a biological phenomenon where plants have harmful effects on growth of surrounding plants through the production of chemical substances. Here we focus on allelochemical processes which operate belowground, can influence plant interactions and therefore potentially affect plant community structure. Soil hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may enhance transport processes in the soil matrix by providing direct connections between plants facilitating infochemical exchange.

In a two-component field study we showed that soil hyphae likely play a crucial role in movement of allelochemicals in natural soils and greatly expand bioactive zones by providing effective transport pathways for chemical compounds. First, we tested the effects of Juglans regia leaf litter extract addition in intact or disrupted hyphal networks and simultaneously determined growth reducing effects on sensitive Lycopersicon lycopersicum plants. Second, we analyzed the effect of juglone on tomato by directly adding leaf litter. In both approaches we found an increase of juglone transport if a hyphal network was present, resulting in reduced growth of target plants.

Our results, together with previous work, add to the body of evidence for hyphae of soil fungi playing an important role in the transfer of allelochemicals and effectively acting as transport highways in the field. We suggest that hyphal connections, mostly formed by AMF, increase the effectiveness of allelochemicals in natural systems and can play a crucial role in chemical interaction processes in the soil.

   
 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A few years ago I mistakenly transplanted a beautiful Dexter rhododendron too close to a black walnut. It is showing stress and it will take a couple of men to move it again. Will the juglone continue to poison the large bush even when I move it?

Thanks
 
pollinator
Posts: 362
72
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You could do the opposite and plant a Japanese heartnut tree. They’re also juglans but different to walnut. You could grow everyone else in raised beds.
 
Live ordinary life in an extraordinary way. Details embedded in this tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic