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Goose eggs  RSS feed

 
r ranson
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I have four or five goose eggs to play with. Never cooked with these before? What's something delicious to make?

I'm thinking meringues.
 
r ranson
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Going to try this meringue recipe. Don't know if I need to adjust anything for the fact that it is goose and not chicken egg.
 
Casie Becker
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Carol Deppe cooks with duck eggs. I imagine that's closer to goose than chicken. She talks about how much better egg drop soup is when made with duck, instead of chicken eggs.
 
Ann Torrence
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Our goose eggs have a much higher proportion of yolk to white than our chicken eggs, so meringue wouldn't be my first thought, but there's no reason it wouldn't work.

Weigh them if you have a scale and substitute by weight, a large chicken egg weighs about 60 grams.

Or we cook them any way we like eggs: fried, scrambled, omelets. Just lower the heat a little

Now that the geese are laying, we are giving our clafoutis recipe a workout. I like this one

And for a real south Texas way to cook eggs, make migas. I will confess that sometimes we use tortilla chips instead of leftover tortillas because there aren't ever any leftover tortillas in our house.
 
John Weiland
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You may also want to look into the "salted/brined duck/goose egg" recipes from the Asian community. When I told a woman at work that we had goose eggs coming out our ears, she got really excited and gladly accepted a big pail of them. She mentioned putting them in heavily salted water for several weeks, then hard-boiling them and using the contents on toast and in other dishes. Never did try that, but find the best use for them either in baking or as hard-boiled complements to potato salad and other salads. Scrambled?....Meh....pretty rich from the big yolk for my tastes, but you might be able to add water or milk to lean it out a bit first. Good also for strait hard-boiled egg salad, but again you may wish to use more vegetable filler (diced celery, etc) to lean out the mixture if too rich for your liking.
 
Raye Beasley
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As others have said, there is not a lot of white in a goose egg compared to yolk. You can use a goose egg in most recipes instead of chicken eggs. Keep in mind that generally, 2 chicken eggs equals 1 duck egg or 3 chicken eggs equals one goose egg for good enough home baking. If you need more accuracy, than you need recipes that go by weight of ingredients rather that quantity. Duck and goose eggs make amazing custards and ice cream.

Goose and duck eggs are great binding agents for hamburgers and meat loaf as well. I find them too rich and too big for a fried egg, but thats just me.
 
r ranson
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Tonight I weighed my eggs (shells on). The chickens eggs weigh about 50g, the goose eggs about 215g each. These are from the average of a sample size of three (three hens eggs, three goose eggs). Some eggs weigh more, some eggs less. The hen eggs were taken from random (aka, today's harvest) and the goose eggs were taken from my youngest goose who also lays the smallest eggs. The older geese lay much larger eggs, but they all have the good sense to put their nests somewhere I approve (and can lock up at night so the raccoons don't get at the nest) so their eggs stay where they are.

So it looks like the 3:1 ratio mentioned earlier in this thread would work well for my goose eggs.

Bought some organic lemons today. I don't normally buy imported food if I can help it, but I thought what the hey. If goose eggs are suppose to be mostly yolk, I had better make some lemon curd.


Anyone else have geese? I would love to get a collection of egg weights so we can discover what kind of variation there is.
 
r ranson
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Goose egg today was 352g (shell on). Not too shabby. Lemon curd, here I come.
 
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