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Things to make with whey

 
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First time making rennet cheese today. Had a total blast making motza with my friend. Now I have a big pot of whey left over. What to do with it?

Of course, one could feed it to the hens, they do appreciate it.

Instead, we heated up the whey and made ricotta cheese. Two cheeses for the price of one.

The rest of the whey will go into bread baking.

What do you do with your whey?
 
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I made Paneer cheese and used the leftover whey to cook potatoes in for mashed potatoes.

Since I used lemon juice for making the Paneer, they had a wonderful, slightly tangy hint of flavor.
 
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I can vouch for the yumminess!
 
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I've been wondering if any of you have made a whey spray for fruit trees? I've heard of it and would love to have a "recipe" for it.
 
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Whey-ade, add lemon or lime juice to the whey, sweeten to taste.

ricotta (though the yield is so small I don't do it, it's the traditional way to make ricotta

make bread, cook grains, use as soup base, smoothies, ferment vegetables.

I know there are lots more things to do but I feed the whey to the chickens, cats and dogs. A household of one, making 10-20 pounds of cheese per week, no whey I could run that through MY diet.

It has a lot of lactose remaining, and I avoid carbohydrates too.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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here is a link that I found through new england cheese making newsletter:

http://blog.cheesemaking.com/using-that-leftover-whey/

Thought it might be a useful link for folks viewing this thread
 
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Thekla McDaniels wrote:no whey I could run that through MY diet.

It has a lot of lactose remaining, and I avoid carbohydrates too.



Nice play with the word!

Lactose.... but no casein! Still has the other proteins.... so it is worth while.
Lactose removal: make kefir! This I call wheyade! Fizzy and acidic taste.

Kefir is a fungi, so it "eats" the lactose. It makes some alcohol, but like 1%.... Yep, alcohol is a mycotoxin!
 
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I made ricotta and then fed the remainder to my piggys.  
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Hmmm,
no one has mentioned getost, not even me.  You cook the water out of the whey.  You have to stir it a lot, and then when it is kind of thick in consistency, to get rid of the graininess, beat or whip it.  It has a sweet flavor, I guess you are concentrated the sugars...

"Deborah Niemann" includes the recipe and method in her book:  Raising Goats Naturally.

Currently, I am feeding the bottle baby goats whey.
 
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Thekla McDaniels wrote:here is a link that I found through new england cheese making newsletter:

http://blog.cheesemaking.com/using-that-leftover-whey/

Thought it might be a useful link for folks viewing this thread



I was going to post this on permies today, cool to see it's already here!

I made 30 min. mozzarella today and used the (acid) whey as a soil amendment for recently planted blueberries. I recently found another source for raw milk, so hopefully I'll be using a lot of those leftover whey ideas.
 
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I find the whey is different from different cheeses. What I get fro mozz is sweeter. All of them are great in stew or chowders. Don't you all simply love the Cheese Queen? I found her about 7 years ago. Here cultures for fresh cheese can't be beat. Love her Yogotherm so much I bought 3 more for each of my kids.
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