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mongolian sheep stomach bag  RSS feed

 
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It's a weird question, but does anyone know how to make a food-safe bag out of a sheep's stomach?

I was reading that kefir was traditionally made in a dried sheep's stomach hung from the rafters of a yurt. I have a sheep due for an ending later this month, and the customer doesn't keep the stomach. Maybe I could give it a try.

Any thoughts on how to make a sheep stomach kefir bag?
 
pollinator
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Dont know about that but a better use might be haggis
Since the USA bans the importation of such delightful food you could be on a winner . Best price if available for Burns night

David
 
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...Haggis?

About using the stomach I don't know, but here they make bags for food from young goats skin... (the ones that are killed at 1 week old for rennet)
I have planned to learn how is the special cut and how they cure it.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Kefir glass jars are so difficult to wash because of the fat that such a bag might be a better way! I wonder how they - if ever - washed it...
 
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No idea about making a bag out of one, sounds risky if it's intended for water carrying.

Alternatively, could also be used as tripe - lots of dishes for that.

 
pollinator
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If you kill a calf that only drink milk and hasn't started eating grass. You will find that if you check it's stomach it will actually have milk curds/cheese/kefir inside of it. That is how we used to get the rennet/protease enzyme to make milk and how we discovered/invented it. At slaughter time people just eat the curds in the stomach and harvested the rennet to make some more. I don't think too many people dies.

We also use stomach/intestine ti make sausages. We survived

I am not too sure, how I would the stomach bag, maybe sew it fill it with kefir and then smoke it.
Or maybe just make some type of a leather. similar to "wineskin"  


 
Xisca Nicolas
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Hehe.... the problem is not about surviving, but about making the stomach survive for some time so we can use it again and again! :)
 
S Bengi
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Ahh now I understand. I thought that it was seen as risky due to the health reason.

I pulled the quote below from off the web maybe their process will give some inspiration.

A bota bag
Each hide is cured with vegetable oils to make it pliable.
Then the skin is cut and sewn by hand to make a tight pleating.
Next, it is turned inside out and pitch is applied.
Very short bristles of hair are left on the leather to hold the pitch for the inside of each bag.
This is heated to create a water proof resin that will last for years.
Once home the bag has to be cured to remove the strong
Soak in water for 36hours, then discard
Soak in wine for as long as possible, then discard.
If you are going to discontinue usage of the bag, open and let it dry.
Once you are ready to use again do the curing/soaking process again



I found this document and it mentioned huhuur
http://www.avrasyad.com/Makaleler/1855919393_20.%20Ichinkhorloo%20LKHAGVASUREN%2094-136.pdf
 
Xisca Nicolas
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I did not see this pic in the document, that is more about customs and mariage!

I have tried to go on kefir without washing, and it develops some mold like cheese and does not smell so nice... That is why I was wondering if they washed the leather bag.
 
S Bengi
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I found the word huhuur in the pdf and then I googled the word and found that picture.

I have two WIDE MOUTH mason jar.
I drop the kefir grains into the other clean mason jar. Then I 'rinse' out the 'active' mason jar with fresh milk and pour it into the clean mason jar with the grains. This allows me to 'keep' some of the old curds and kefir, but still get to wash the jars. Mostly I just pour the kefir milk into cheesecloth to strain it after 12 hours before huge curds set in. I am the left with a clear whey at the bottom and 'curd' in the cheese cloth after 12hours in the fridge. I normally season and place it in a mold making kefir cheese.
 
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