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tumeric supplement brands?

 
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My question is....what is a good natural, inexpensive brand of turmeric supplement? I currently use the dry in my morning smoothies (1/2 - 1 tsp.) daily. But at that rate, I'm finding out (a $5 a bottle of organic dry) it can be a little costly at this rate. So, I was thinking of switching to a supplement. But there are so many out there, some of which are pretty pricey, I'm not sure which one to choose. Any suggestions? I'd like to get one that includes the piperine to aid in bioavailability.
 
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I would expect supplements to always be more expensive than the equivalent amount of food-grade product. If it's not more expensive, I'd expect it to be food-grade spice jammed into a capsule. There's a lot of markup and marketing expense in the supplement business that you don't usually find on the food side.

In your shoes if looking for economy, I'd be thinking hard about the reasons why I'm buying organic, and whether (in the small gross quantities consumed) the risk from residual pesticides and such was worth paying so much premium to avoid. But I am much more about including economic risk in my personal risk analyses than the average Permie seems to be.

The turmeric I use costs about fifty cents an ounce (dried/powdered) from the Asian supermarket. But it's mystery stuff from China. I pays me money and I takes me chances.

 
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Depending on what country you are in, there can be very little regulation on what goes into a supplement. There can even be undisclosed fillers.

Given a choice, I would trust the food turmeric over the suppliments.

Perhaps there is a more affordable source of organic food turmeric?
 
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Hi Tina,

Forgive me if this is not the answer you're hoping for. I'm thinking outside of the box. I suggest buying organic fresh turmeric and use a food dehydrator if both are available to you. Fresh turmeric root (from Hawaii) can be found at this time of year (late winter) in large grocery or health food stores or ethnic markets. It dries rather quickly at 135 F on a dehydrator when sliced thinly ( I used wax paper to protect the trays, it can stain). I made this little jar of dried turmeric root with little effort in one day. It smells heavenly. I use it in teas. It could be made into a powder with the help of a mortar and pestle or even a food processor perhaps. This might be a cost effective route for quality. Or consider buying in bulk (also cost effective without the extra work or stained fingers): https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/turmeric-root-powder/profile.

Maybe season it with a little black pepper to get the piperine?

Sorry I don't know anything about brands.

Becky
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Perhaps there is a more affordable source of organic food turmeric?



Frontier sells bulk herbs, among other things and if you can form a buying club of sorts, wholesale prices apply with orders over a certain amount. Their turmeric was at a very good price, organic and seemed to be good quality. "Turmeric root powder, Alleppey (minimum 4% curcumin) ORGANIC" $8.20 per pound. ...and 'fair trade certified' is 10.50 per pound.
For us, orders happen whenever the group has enough for the minimum....one person does the organizing and we pay an extra 15% for that...well worth it.
 
pollinator
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Er have you thought of growing it ? If you have a green house maybe

David
 
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Location: Aroostook County, Maine
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What's your interest in Turmeric?

It's funny that I've found this thread, as I recently read elsewhere that it helps alcalize your body if added to coffee, so my wife and I have only been adding it to coffee for 3 days, now!

She's Jamaican, so she's been cooking with it forever, but I really like it in my coffee...
 
pollinator
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David Livingston wrote:Er have you thought of growing it ? If you have a green house maybe

David



Yes, what David said. You don't even need a greenhouse. In my zone 8b/9a climate, turmeric dies at the first frost, but it comes back from the corms the following year. A good Indian grocery store will be able to supply you with live turmeric corms that you can plant. I have it in with the cannas; they look similar, but on close inspection, you can tell them apart. The leaves are also edible, and best used as a chiffonade in cooking (unless you cut them up fine, they are kind of fibrous and chewy).
 
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