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How many different fruit trees have you got?

 
Marco Banks
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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I'll admit it: I'm a tree addict. My wife just bought me an almond for our 25th anniversary. I can think of no better gift than another tree, even though it's getting harder and harder to find a space to plant anything else.

Today as family was over for Easter, my brother (who had sat down to watch a bit of the March Madness hoops tourney) said, "You ought to get surround sound speakers for your TV. You can get a nice system for less than $100 bucks." I replied, "That's 3 more fruit trees—maybe 4."

In our suburban orchard/food forest, we've planted about 50 fruit trees (most are unique—only a few duplicates).

I'm curious if anyone can beat me.

Almond: All-In-One

Apple:
Anna
Dorsett Golden
Fuji
Gala
Pink Lady (CrippsPink)

Apricot
Royal Blenheim

Aprium Interspecific:
Cot-N-Candy White
Flavor Delight

Asian Pear:
Hosui
Shinseiki
20th Century

Avocado:
Fuerte
Haas

Cherimoya:
Unknown variety

Cherry:
Minnie Royal
Royal Lee

Fig:
Black Mission
Brown Turkey
Janice Seedless Kadota

Pineapple Guava

Lemon:
Eureka
Improved Meyer

Lime:
Bearss
Key (Mexican)

Mandarin Orange:
Gold Nugget
Satsuma

NectaPlum:
Spice Zee

Nectarine:
Arctic Star
Double Delight

Orange:
Moro Blood Orange
Valencia
Washington Naval

Peach:
Eva’s Pride
Mid Pride
Red Baron
Babcock

Persimmon:
Fuyu (Jiro)

Plum:
Methley
Santa Rosa

Pluot:
Flavor King
Flavor Grenade
Dapple Dandy

Pomegranate:
Wonderful

 
Jo Hunter-Adams
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Very fun to list! I have 1 acre total, 1/2 an acre dedicated to a young food forest. So far, this is what we have in terms of trees/perennial shrubs that have an edible crop-- but we're working on getting many more trees! We do have quite a bit of duplication-- like 10 pomegranate trees because I got overly excited that they actually survive our hot dry summer in the Western Cape of South Africa. Heading into winter here, so I'm really looking forward to planting many more trees!

macadamia nut
Natal plum
Orange- not sure kind!
Naartjie (type of tangerine)
Grape Fruit- star ruby
Marula
Kei apple
pawpaw
banana (Williiams)
Bay tree
Fuji apple
Golden delicious apple
Lemon - Cape Roughskin
Lemon- Eureka
Almond- Texas Mission
Almond- Peerless
Apricot- soldonne
Apricot- unknown, another kind
Guava
Peach- early
Peach- some other kind!
Plum- one kind
Plum- another kind!
Pomegranate- wonderful
Pomegranate- another variety
Moringa oleifeira
Fig- Turkey
Mulberry
Avocado- Hass
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Very inspiring lists for small spaces!

 
John Wolfram
Posts: 632
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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Marco, I am so jealous of your cherimoya, but with 5 acres to play around with I may have you beat in terms of variety types.

Just my non-interspecific plums:

Alderman
Bluebyrd
Bubblegum
Castelton
Crimson Beauty
Duarte
Early Italian
Early Golden
Elephant Heart
Empress
Fortune
Friar
Green Gage
Kaga
Kenmore
Lavina
Long John
Methly
Oblinaja
President
Queen Rosa
Rosy Gage
Ruby Queen
Santa Rosa
Seneca
Shiro
Stanley
Valor
Vanier
Victory
Vision
Wikson
 
Marco Banks
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Posts: 344
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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books chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees urban woodworking
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Wow -- that's a lot of plums. I wish I had 5 acres.

Are you grafting those yourself, buying them pre-grafted, or are they just native and grown from seed?

What else are you growing?
 
wayne fajkus
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I don't track varieties, but here's my list:

Kumquat
Meyers lemon
Ponderosa lemon
Orange
Grapefruit
Pear
Plum
Apple
FIG
Peach
Magic fruit
Pecan

Some are in pots for freeze reasons

 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Akebia
China Blue
Stauntonia
Grape
Hardy Kiwi
Passionfruit
Arctic Kiwiberry
Magnolia Vine

Juneberry
Russian Almond
Elderberry
JuJube
PawPaw
Mt. Ash
Dwarf Shipova Pear
Seaberry
Aronia
Fig
Goumi
Quince

Artic Raspberry
Ligonberry
emerald carpet raspberry
Wintergreen
Autum Olive
Kinnickinch
Strawberry

Saltbush
Corn Salad
Seakale
Miners Lettuce
Sea Beet
Arugala Rocket
Lovage
Lamb Quaters
Mush Mallow
Apple-Columnar
Currant
ApricotNut
Silverberry
Medlar
Perssimons
peactocum
Hazelnut
Honeyberry
C.Cherry
Beach Plum
Edible Flowers/herb nasturtium, dandelions, pansy, marigold, dill, daylilly, garlic, onions, sage, lavender, rosemary, thyme, mint, etc
Pomergrante
Gooseberry
Cherry
4N1 Pluot
Citrus Flying Dragon

Pear
All Field Berry
Mulberry
Cranberry
YellowhornNut
 
John Wolfram
Posts: 632
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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Marco Banks wrote:Wow -- that's a lot of plums. I wish I had 5 acres. Are you grafting those yourself, buying them pre-grafted, or are they just native and grown from seed? What else are you growing?

In addition the plums, I grow peaches, interspecific pums/apricots, apricots, Asian pears, European pears, persimmons, pawpaws, a few apples, and a few cherries. Right now about 85% of my trees were bought pre-grafted. If I can get a 3/4 inch diameter trunk bareroot tree in the variety I want for $10-$12, that's what I'll choose every time. That being said, I have 400 persimmon or pawpaw rootstock arriving in April so my pre-grafted percentage will be dropping like a rock.
 
Mary-Ellen Zands
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I went crazy earlier spent an hour listing all my trees and then when I hit submit the whole session had timed out, so I lost it all. Just as well since I came up with a long list of things I forgot to add. When I moved to the country 15 years ago. I planted like a maniac. The first thing I planted were kiwi vines. I hadn't even moved in yet and the place was rented and I was planting in the snow, in November, obsessed I guess you could say I was, or am! There are 20 acres, about 8 acres of cedar bush that was planted in the 70's, because they said the land wasn't good for anything else. I have planted 300-400 trees every spring for about 10 years. So now I have a mixed bush. The saplings were donated by different counties and they were left overs that no one wanted, after the free spring give aways. So no $ put out. Just time and energy and blessings said over each tree as it was being planted.
So my list so far, I'm sure I'm still missing some is;
maple trees we tap and make Maple syrup
birch which I will tap in the future sometime
apple orchard empire, cortlands, lobo and many ancient varieties that I graft onto wild apple trees.
asian pear which I had grafted onto my wild apple tree and 2 grafts took were beautiful and robust and after 3 years and the winter of 2014/15 they died.
nanny berry wild currant grow wild in all my hedgerows
osage orange which is rare for this area
hawthorne
elderberries
goji berries
haskap
strawberries
gooseberries
blueberries
kiwis hardy issai
another hardy variety larger than the issai that I use to dehydrate since I'm allergic to these fresh.
grapes many varieties from my italian neighbours, that they brought back from the homeland
black walnut
carpathian walnuts that I brought back the nuts from Romania myself. Put into my test garden and one escaped from me and is now 9 meters high harvested 2 buckets of walnuts the last 2 years.
White Mulberries for the fruit, the leaves, the bark, the roots, leaves for teas and for my silk worms.
Plums green gage
Italian blue
large blue
Cherries sour
nanking

My inside trees that get moved in and out
Myers lemon,
3 types of passion fruit,
Many more too many to mention just planted for my soul

 
Mary-Ellen Zands
Posts: 19
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It really helps my trees when I do the biodynamic tree paste and they just seem to gobble it up. You really notice it on the trees that are doing poorly, they look like they've been revived a year later!
IMG_0099.JPG
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making my biodynamic tree paste
IMG_0101 1.JPG
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applying it to my mulberry tree
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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