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A salvage problem  RSS feed

 
Gilbert Fritz
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Location: Denver, CO
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So, I was given a greenhouse frame, free if I tore it down. Lumber, a small amount of glass (people had already taken that) trellis wire, brackets, hinges and misc. hardware, bricks, strawberry plants, and misc. other items.

So, I got to work. But it was put together with screws, that were almost all rusted into place. They had plenty of head, but wouldn't come out. By using my cordless drills as manual power assisted ratchet drivers, I was able to get some of them out (and broke seven driver heads.) The rest had to be cut with a reciprocating saw (which wore out a lot of blades.) It took forever.

How would a professional go about this? I suppose they would have cut the lumber with the reciprocating saw, but that would have ruined the rebuild potential of the frame, and lowered the resale or reuse value of the lumber. Not to mention that I still would have had to get the screws out sometime.
 
wayne fajkus
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You made it happen with the tools available. I would have used a grinder with either a cut off wheel or a grinding disc to get the heads off
 
Dillon Nichols
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Location: Victoria BC
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An impact wrench or very powerful impact driver might have helped, but then again maybe not...

If rebuilding something, salvaging it in sections as large as possible is great for minimizing labour. A large full-length roof-rack is helpful for this; a trailer or truck with a good sized flatbed is even better.

I would have no interest in salvaging common lumber for resale unless it was very quick; only posts/beams/trusses would warrant much time investment. If salvaging for my own use and not planning to rebuild, would have done as you say and cut the lumber in some spots to speed things up(ends).


A professional OTOH would probably have gotten paid to remove the structure!
 
Gilbert Fritz
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Yes, I don't think the lumber would have had much resale value. And I agree; if we could have taken big sections that would have been great. But all we had was a van with all the seats taken out, so everything had to collapse. It took us 30 man hours to take it down. We were partially doing it as a test case for latter paying work. It seemed that we would have had to charge $600 to make a decent pay, so I'm trying to figure out how to speed it up. Of course, we could have just taken a sledge and reciprocating saw and smashed everything, but then there would have been dump fees eating up the money. So keeping things usable (so that people will haul them away free) seems to be an important part of the business model.

Wayne; once the heads were cut off, would the lumber then sledge apart? Or would the threads still hold things together?
 
wayne fajkus
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It depends. Some screws have smooth shank by head so wood would slide out. Maybe a pry bar to separate the 2 wood pieces. Or a recipro between the 2 pieces and not mess with the head
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Purple Moosege Dale Hodgins, he our my demo-knowledge go to guy.
 
Gilbert Fritz
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I'm waiting for Dale to return to my main thread on this topic, we will see.

Also, looks like I should have had an electric impact driver.
 
Travis Johnson
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It may not have worked in this case, but you would be shocked at how big of a structure you can move with relatively small machines. I have moved several old building on my Grandmother's old farm across the road to my house. Some have even joked I am going to bring over her house too, and honestly I have yet to rule that out!

On a 13 x 18 shed I jacked it up and put skids under it and then hitched onto it with my little Kubota Tractor. I asked my father if I thought it would move the building. His take was that it would, and I did not think so...we had chains on the back tires, but we never spun a tire!

If you can get a building under the telephone wires, you can move it relatively cheaply and easily.
 
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